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Understanding Implicit Operator Overloading in C#

, 15 Aug 2006 CPOL
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Explains the implicit operator overloading in C#

Introduction

Everyone knows that in .NET, byte, char, int, long, etc. are value data types and string is a reference data type. Even though it is a reference type, string behaves much like a value type. In other words, it can directly accept values and doesn't require new to create an instance. For example:

string name = "M. Aamir Maniar"; //Directly accepts the value.

So far so good. Everyone is well acquainted with this basic demeanor of the string class. But the fact is that, most of them don't know how to incorporate such things into their own classes. To explain this concept, let's think about the Currency class. Currency class fundamentally has two properties:

  • Sign //String: Holds the currency sign like $,£,¥,€,Rs., etc.
  • Value //Decimal: Holds the currency value

The class has one constructor which accepts two parameters, i.e. value and sign which set the respective properties of the class. So if you are creating an instance of the class, you will do that in the following manner:

Currency cur = new Currency(100.50, "$");
Right? Assuming $ is a default currency sign, don't you think this is a bit tedious way to instantiate such kind of data type. What about the following approach:

Currency cur = 100; //Currency directly accepts value
//Instantiating currency using currency sign.
Currency cur = "€"; 
cur.Value = 100;    //Implicit typecasting from number to Currency

//What about this
long lCur = cur;    //Implicit typecasting from Currency to long 
decimal dCur = cur; //Implicit type casting from Currency to decimal 

The Implicit Operator

If you want to incorporate such a feature, an implicit operator overloading comes into the picture. Yes, there is something called implicit operator overloading. According to MSDN, an implicit keyword is used to declare an implicit user-defined type conversion operator. In other words, this gives the power to your C# class, which can accepts any reasonably convertible data type without type casting. And such a kind of class can also be assigned to any convertible object or variable. If you want to create an implicit operator function, here is a signature of creating them in C#.

«access specifier» static implicit operator «converting type» («convertible type» rhs)

The above signature states that the operator accepts «convertible type» and converts into «converting type».

The following code shows you how to create them:

/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><summary></span>
/// Creates Currency object from string supplied as currency sign.
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"></summary></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><param name="rhs">The currency sign like $,£,¥,€,Rs etc. </param></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><returns>Returns new Currency object.</returns></span>
public static implicit operator Currency(string rhs)
{ 
    Currency c = new Currency(0, rhs); //Internally call Currency constructor
    return c;

}

/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><summary></span>
/// Creates a currency object from decimal value. 
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"></summary></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><param name="rhs">The currency value in decimal.</param></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><returns>Returns new Currency object.</returns></span>
public static implicit operator Currency(decimal rhs)
{
    Currency c = new Currency(rhs, NumberFormatInfo.CurrentInfo.CurrencySymbol);
    return c;

/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><summary></span>
/// Creates a decimal value from Currency object,
/// used to assign currency to decimal.
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"></summary></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><param name="rhs">The Currency object.</param></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><returns>Returns decimal value of the currency</returns></span>
public static implicit operator decimal(Currency rhs)
{
    return rhs.Value;
}

/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><summary></span>
/// Creates a long value from Currency object, used to assign currency to long.
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"></summary></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><param name="rhs">The Currency object.</param></span>
/// <span class="code-SummaryComment"><returns>Returns long value of the currency</returns></span>
public static implicit operator long(Currency rhs)
{
    return (long)rhs.Value;
}

Behind the Scene

Such kind of implicit operator overloading is not supported by all languages, then how does C# incorporate such a nice feature. The answer lies in an assembly code generated by the C# compiler. The following table shows the C# syntax with the corresponding IL syntax.

C# declaration IL Declaration
public static implicit operator 
	Currency(decimal rhs) 
.method public hidebysig specialname static 
class Currency op_Implicit(valuetype [mscorlib]
System.Decimal rhs) cil managed
public static implicit operator 
	decimal(Currency rhs)
.method public hidebysig specialname static 
valuetype [mscorlib]System.Decimal op_Implicit
(class Currency rhs) cil managed

The IL syntax in the above table makes it clear that the C# compiler generates op_Implicit function which returns «converting type» and accepts «converting type».

Hope this article is useful to you.

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History

  • 15th August, 2006: Initial post

License

This article, along with any associated source code and files, is licensed under The Code Project Open License (CPOL)

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aamironline
Chief Technology Officer Maniar Technologies Pvt Ltd
India India
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Comments and Discussions

 
NewsThanks Pinmembermishenkovks11-Dec-07 2:39 
GeneralThanks Pinmembermishenkovks11-Dec-07 2:38 
GeneralLosing information PinmemberJeffrey Sax20-Aug-06 9:03 
GeneralRe: Losing information PinmemberM Aamir Maniar20-Aug-06 17:20 
GeneralRe: Losing information Pinmemberstano11-Feb-07 5:43 
GeneralRe: Losing information PinmemberMartinFister18-Apr-10 6:15 
QuestionHow to: Define a Conversion Operator in VB Pinmemberred baron16-Aug-06 11:09 
look at: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yf7b9sy7.aspx
AnswerRe: How to: Define a Conversion Operator in VB PinmemberM Aamir Maniar16-Aug-06 16:49 
GeneralNice article and a suggestion PinmemberDustin Metzgar16-Aug-06 3:54 
GeneralRe: Nice article and a suggestion PinmemberM Aamir Maniar16-Aug-06 6:23 

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