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, 22 May 2014 CPOL
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Fashions come into style and go out of style and when they’ve gone you often look at pictures of yourself and think “why on earth did I wear that”. Its no different in software development, with various tech gaining favour and becoming “fashionable” with everybody wanting to be using that tech only

fashionFashions come into style and go out of style and when they’ve gone you often look at pictures of yourself and think “why on earth did I wear that”.

Its no different in software development, with various tech gaining favour and becoming “fashionable” with everybody wanting to be using that tech only to find that it drops of of fashion later.  It used to take years for things to become unfashionable but with the rate of change increasing this may drop to a few months or even weeks.

At the moment micro-services appears to be becoming fashionable but interestingly if you follow the conversations around this you’ll find that its really “SOA done right”, and SOA apparently became unfashionable a while back.

What makes it more complicated for us is that new technologies often appear to be an improvement on how we’ve done things previously and as such we want to be using them, the knack is finding that “classic” item amongst all the chaff.

There is no easy way to find that classic, you need to spend time using the technology to get a feel for its strengths and weakness, there are shortcuts – you can read blog posts by people using the technology (posts I find particularly good are the ones where the author ran into a problem with the technology and how they solved that problem) and use GitHub to look at projects others have written with the technology you are looking at, but when I comes down to it using the technology is the only way you can be sure yourself if you’ve found a classic that will stand the test of time.


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This article, along with any associated source code and files, is licensed under The Code Project Open License (CPOL)

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About the Author

Nathan Gloyn
Nock Consulting
United Kingdom United Kingdom
Passionate developer, designer, Certified Scrum Professional, wanna-be architect, agile evangelist, and presenter.
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