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I have studied C, from books like "Practical C programming" by Kochan,almost finishing "A book on C" by Pohl , and the first chapters of "Native C programming, a modern approach" by King.
In a few weeks I want to start with C++. Is the "A complete guide to programming in C++" by Prinz (2001) a good book? I mean is it accurate? will it expose me to good programming habits? There was no review of it in the
http://accu.org/index.php/book_reviews[^]
Posted 17-Feb-11 8:58am
geodoom411
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Solution 1

For C++, I always suggest that you read one of the books by Bjarne Stroustrup.
There is a list here .
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Comments
Nishant Sivakumar at 17-Feb-11 15:06pm
   
Voted 5!
SAKryukov at 17-Feb-11 16:23pm
   
I would agree (my 5 anyway), but this is the only one I read (not counting complete gibberish I saw long time ago).
 
Unfortunately, I can see two problems with Bjarne Stroustrup.
1) His books are not easy to understand for beginners (however, I don't know OP level);
2) Bjarne looks stubborn to me; he is educating C++ centric view without teaching computer science or development as such, as if his goal to educate strong C++ addicts. I worked with some wonderfully strong Stroustrup-educated C++ masters, but they have huge trouble understanding wider concepts which were actually very important because we developed something requiring compatibility with other words; I have huge problems keeping portability with them. The problem is common, it's not just my experience; I can clearly compare with developers in other languages.
 
--SA
Marcus Kramer at 17-Feb-11 19:10pm
   
I agree with you that he is not an easy read, but he presents C++ as he meant it to be in its purest form. After understanding that, layering on the different mutations and understanding where the language and the mutation begins become second nature. I'm a little partial because I learned C++ that way and of course that is why I like this route.
Rejeesh.T.S at 18-Feb-11 3:30am
   
There is a book by Stroustrup titled 'Programming -- Principles and Practice Using C++'which is aimed at beginners. http://www.stroustrup.com/Programming/
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Solution 2

Start with one book, and then read maybe a couple more.
 
See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/the-definitive-c-book-guide-and-list[^]
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Solution 3

I found this on-line book http://www.relisoft.com/book/preface.html[^] very useful.
If focus specifically on the difference between C and C++ (and what you should forget about C to properly use C++).
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Solution 5

I usually recommend Stanley Lippmans "C++ Primer" as a first book on C++.
 
I'm pretty sure that you have discovered that while many people are able to write a big tome on one topic or the other - the art of creating something that's actually readable from page 1 and onward isn't mastered by all.
 
The "C++ Primer" is actually readable, and the authors lead the reader gently from chapter to chapter - you could do far worse Smile | :)
 
Nishant Sivakumar book: C++/CLI in Action[^] is highly recommended if you are thinking about using C++/CLI.
 
Regards
Espen Harlinn
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v2
Comments
Abhinav S at 19-Feb-11 11:59am
   
Good advice. 5.
Espen Harlinn at 19-Feb-11 12:16pm
   
Thank you Abhinav!
Hans Dietrich at 20-Feb-11 13:17pm
   
Totally agree about Lippman. Only wish Stroustrup would adopt his style.
Espen Harlinn at 20-Feb-11 14:11pm
   
Thank you Hans!
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Solution 6

Some online tutorial
Learn CPP->[^]
 
Cplusplus->[^]
 
Exporsys ->[^]
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Solution 7

I happen to own both of these books and by all means you should get them since both authors do good job of explaining the "cin's" and "cout's" of the C++ language, but personally as a starting point for any wanna be C++ programmer i would recommend going through the "C++ Primer" by Lipman.
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