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Hi ,
 
we planning to design a project which has 5 modules.As an upcoming developer,i don't know how to design a project and how exactly it happens in big scale companies.
 
I would like to use many no. of dll's with few classes.Is this better way of designing or shall i go with few dll with more classes.
 
One dll with many classes or more dll's with fewer classes,which performs better.

Suggest me,books or pdf to learn real world project design scenario.
 
Please help me..
 
Thanking you all.
 
S.V.Hyd
Posted 24-Sep-11 1:51am
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Solution 3

That depends on what you want to do with your dll's.
Let's say you create a custom control for your project and want to re-use it in different projects. In this case you would create a dll which contains your custom control. Now in your other projects you simply have to reference your dll and you're set to go. If you didn't make a dll out of your control you'd have to reference the entire different project, which does not seem like a good idea.
So basically the amount of dll's you need depends upon how much of your code you want to use in other projects.
 
Here are some articles on good design[^]. The first five are all about SOLID principles. The remainder is about how to structure your dll's (or at least one way to do it). Hope it helps.
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Comments
Mehdi Gholam at 24-Sep-11 11:48am
   
My 5!
Naerling at 24-Sep-11 11:51am
   
Thanks :)
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Solution 1

Usually, classes are grouped by functionality or purpose. Many times a single dll will suffice. The only time I have multiple dlls is if the code is a 3rd party library or if the code is shared among several assemblies.
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