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Hello friends,
 

Please guide me I want to make a clear difference between Object Oriented Languages and Object Based Languages/
 
I checked over the net where I found some information but they were clashing.
 
Like
Javascript is an Object Oriented Programming and in another forum I found it was written Javascript is an Object Based Programming. which one is correct no idea..
 
AND what's the reason behind that a language is either Object oriented or Object Based. Or How can I judge which language is Object oriented and Object based?
 
Please guide me... I don't want to get more confuse.
 
Thanks
Posted 22-Nov-11 18:52pm

1 solution

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Solution 1

First of all, read about the basics:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-based_language[^],
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming[^].
 
You may find that the notion of "object-based" is not well-defined. This is true. This notion came with some languages which cannot be called truly object-oriented. This is something like Rubic Cube with all facets painted in the same green color. Not rotating. (One may ask: Why green, not some other color? For the military. Smile | :) ) One example is VB6.
 
In my understanding, "object-oriented" is started with the dynamic dispatch or dynamic binding and hence, a possibility for late binding, see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_dispatch[^],
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_binding[^].
 
As to the requirement for inheritance (which is by some reason is called as a primary distinguished object-oriented feature in the the first referenced article), it comes with late binding automatically, because without inheritance nothing is "late". Smile | :)
 
This is where OOP is started. Next important feature, interfaces, was not initially introduced in OOP, so it is not considered as absolutely required for OOP. Same thing about delegates and events and, finally, reflection. All these features are considered to be integral part of OOP, but not absolutely required. As to generics, they are pretty much unrelated.
 
—SA
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Comments
Manish Namdev at 23-Nov-11 1:40am
   
Thanks SAKryukov
SAKryukov at 23-Nov-11 1:41am
   
My pleasure.
Good luck,
--SA

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