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Hello, I am a decent programmer and am in the final year of Info Tech Engineering.
I want to do a project for my final year that will help someone or be practically useful in some way to others.
Like this "One inputs attributes and functional dependencies of a table to the computer/my program and my program/project normalizes the database up to 3 NF(Normal form) and gives to to the user. "
I need more Ideas like these.
Please don't suggest me stupid project topic like Student, railway management system etc etc.
I NEED YOUR HELP TO HELP ME CHOOSE A REALISTIC GOOD AND AWESOME PROJECT !!
PLEASE HELP ME!!!!
Posted 15-Jul-12 16:52pm
Comments
Wes Aday at 15-Jul-12 23:09pm
   
This question was asked just a couple of days ago. http://www.codeproject.com/Answers/420388/Please-Suggest-me-a-Good-Cocept-for-my-dot-net-Pro#answer1. Maybe not the answer that you want to hear but the fact of the matter is that this is not a question that 99% of the users here will answer.
pwasser at 15-Jul-12 23:12pm
   
This is hardly a programming question more like how to solve your existential crisis. If someone comes up with a brilliant idea will you give them credit or claim the idea as your own? Try to think for yourself.
Richard MacCutchan at 16-Jul-12 5:06am
   
The standard answer to this question is: A program that generates awesome project titles for students too lazy to do their own research.
gladiatron at 2-Oct-12 17:43pm
   
@Rich: LOL :) was just browsing through the questions and found this thread.
Richard MacCutchan at 3-Oct-12 3:49am
   
The only answer really :)
Legor at 4-Oct-12 3:53am
   
I like this idea!
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Solution 2

If you like mathematical / signal-processing kind of projects, one good project is to replicate the Sinesum2 program in your favorite GUI language. The theory behind this program is available from the free online Fourier Transforms course available from Stanford Engineering Everywhere -
http://see.stanford.edu/see/courseinfo.aspx?coll=84d174c2-d74f-493d-92ae-c3f45c0ee091[^]
 
and the Sinesum2 program is itself downloadable from
http://see.stanford.edu/see/materials/lsoftaee261/assignments.aspx[^]
 
The Sinesum2 program enables the user to specify the amplitude and phase corresponding to a harmonic. The user can specify any number of harmonics (say, upto 20, which is a reasonable number), and it will compute the resulting combined signal. Additionally, it will play that signal as a sound. It will also display the spectral profile as a three-dimensional plot.
 
Now, there's a catch: To try out the Sinesum2 program downloadable from that site, you'll need Matlab. If you are studying in a university, then, perhaps, you'll find Matlab installations there. If you don't have Matlab, then doing this project is difficult.
 
Replicating this functionality in your favorite language will enable you to learn a lot of things - creating 3-D plots, creating sound from a signal stored digitally, besides creating the combined signal from a set of harmonics. You only need to watch about 4 or 5 lectures from this Fourier Transform course to be able to understand what Sinesum2 actually does.
 
If you are new to signal processing, getting this through would take at least two months of dedicated effort.
 
Once completed, you can also post this onto CodeProject Smile | :)
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Solution 1

Hey Oliver!
I'm currently working on a project that inputs live audio from a guitar or piano via the mic input and creates a virtual midi controller, this might be something you could try on a hardware and software level,
 
best of luck,
Jordan
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