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hi
 
i have a deep question about that why in recent years any new language didnt replace to c or c++ or java ? is that mean the computer science didnt have any evolution since 1970 ?
 
if its not true , so why a new language with new structure and new syntax and new thinking about machines and computers didnt born and replace them?
 
and in last , what about future? it'll be happened in future? how many years later you think?
 
and you think which language is best for learning now and it'll have succsess in future?
Posted 5-Feb-13 22:30pm
hor_313611
Comments
CHill60 at 6-Feb-13 4:37am
   
This should really have been posted in one of the Forums or the Lounge.
Andreas Gieriet at 6-Feb-13 10:10am
   
Don't focus on learning "the one an only important" language. There is none.
Learn the *concepts* of programming languages and use one currently wide spread language to exercise these concepts as much as they are covered by that language. You will have to learn several languages as you go on.
See also my comments in solution #4.
Cheers
Andi
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Solution 1

Languages have evolved plenty since the 70's. C# is a modern language which evolved from Java, which in turn evolved from C++ and C. Object-oriented programming didn't really come to the fore until the 90's and now the majority of languages are based on these principles.
 
Don't forget that you have client-side languages like Javascript which have arisen as a direct result of the internet, and these technologies continue to develop as we speak.
 
Languages like Fortran, COBOL and Pascal have fallen by the wayside becuase they are no longer as useful for the majority of systems that now need to be written. C is still a very useful language though because it works at such a low level, enables direct access to the hardware and is much easier to understand than assembler - all of which are relevant in the modern world. So I guess it's 'survival of the fittest'.
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v4
Comments
Jason Gleim at 6-Feb-13 22:18pm
   
Not to troll (ok... maybe a little), but C#'s lineage identifies much closer with VB than it does with Java. I know that makes the c# purists go batty but it's true. Wrap VB in curly braces and you've invented c#.
Mohibur Rashid at 7-Feb-13 2:09am
   
don't agree
Jason Gleim at 7-Feb-13 9:27am
   
Doesn't matter if you agree or not, it doesn't change the facts. Remember that Java wasn't released until 1995 and Microsoft was already well underway with the .Net framework and the new language just as Java was being released. So you are going to try to tell me that MS, who did everything their way, thought Java was so brilliant they copied it for their new language? That's laughable.
 
And if you are so convinced c# came from Java, then you should be able to backup your opinion by quickly identifying 5 or more features of c# that are shared between it and Java that aren't present in VB.Net. And if you can't do that, then you should stop posting your opinion in places where you can't back it up.
Mohibur Rashid at 7-Feb-13 20:15pm
   
If you want to speak for Microsoft keep going, but when you say "While java was published and microsft was already underway" it tells a lot. For me both of them commercial product. Both of them will do their best to promote their applications. Where as only few is out their to speak for compiler like c/c++.
 
I saw thousands words for VB while I was student, after release of C# it become a piece of crap for every one. C#, Java both are bullsh*t. Corporation employed so many hours to make it easier for the programmers. What I see with about C#? you can drag and drop your button on the form.
 
If you compare with C# and Java, all C# programmer use Win32 API in their application. When you use win32 api in the application, its not comparable with JAVA anymore, JAVA speaks about portability, C#????????
 
You can try to explain the power of C#, but I am too stubborn to understand or accept, that speaking for C# is nothing but promotional talk.
Jason Gleim at 8-Feb-13 9:51am
   
>> If you want to speak for Microsoft keep going, but when you say "While java was published and microsft was already underway" it tells a lot.
 
How so? Are you suggesting that when Java was released Microsoft should have abandoned its work on .NET? Further to that idea do you think that anyone should abandon their ideas if someone else comes out with something similar? If so I guess we could make the point then, that since I am right and you are wrong you should shut up.
 
>> For me both of them commercial product. Both of them will do their best to promote their applications.
 
Yes... they are both commercial products.. and C# is also an ISO standard (ISO/IEC 23270:2003) just like C++ is (ISO/IEC 14882:2011). And yes... the respective companies will promote their products... that is what companies do so people get interested in them and spend their money on those things. I'm beginning to get the idea that you are one of those OSS snobs that thinks anything released for profit is evil.
 
>> Where as only few is out their to speak for compiler like c/c++.
 
Yea... because nobody knows who Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan are or what GCC is.
 
>> I saw thousands words for VB while I was student, after release of C# it become a piece of crap for every one. C#, Java both are bullsh*t.
 
Not sure what your point is here but you've proven you can use big-boy words. Are you disappointed that C# effectively killed VB5/6 development? Why all the anger at C# and Java? Did they gang up and molest you in a bathroom somewhere?
 
>> Corporation employed so many hours to make it easier for the programmers.
 
Yea... because if it is easier for programmers the company makes more money and they pay the programmers better. It is the circle of life. Learn how the world works.
 
>> What I see with about C#? you can drag and drop your button on the form.
 
You should probably try creating a Hello World program in C# before you go off claiming that the best you can do in C# is drag a button on a form. I'll write a desktop app in C# that will look better, run better, and will take a quarter of the time than what you can write in C/C++.
 
>> If you compare with C# and Java, all C# programmer use Win32 API in their application. When you use win32 api in the application, its not comparable with JAVA anymore, JAVA speaks about portability, C#????????
 
You are, once again, wrong. C# and VB.Net run on the .NET framework. Although they can call system API's, they don't run directly on the system... they run in a JIT compiled framework. Just like... wait for it... JAVA!!!! Oh yea... there is the Mono framework for running .net applications on Linux. Does knowing that piss you off too because the purity of Linux is being polluted by Microsoft?
 
Further, nobody is claiming .NET is designed for portability. Objective-C isn't portable... even the various strains of Java have their limitations and ties into the underlying platform.
 
>> You can try to explain the power of C#, but I am too stubborn to understand or accept, that speaking for C# is nothing but promotional talk.
 
You misspelled 'ignorant' there...
Aweiwei_ at 8-Feb-13 4:09am
   
well,the concept & struct of c# is from java.And the concept & struct of a language is its soul.Maybe the use of c# is nearly as the same of vb,but find a customize class in vb then you can prove your opinion.
Jason Gleim at 8-Feb-13 9:29am
   
I'm not sure where you make the claim that the concept and structure of C# is from Java... the concept and structure of C# is from C/C++. (Try looking it up on Google or Wikipedia) Java, also, bases its syntactic structure mostly on C/C++. (Again, look it up before you run your mouth) Claiming that C#'s lineage is based on Java is like claiming that apples and oranges taste the same because they are both round.
 
Further... I have no idea what you are talking about when you say I can prove my point by finding a "customize class" because I don't know what the hell you are talking about. Any class can be considered a custom class and if you are suggesting VB.Net doesn't have classes, I laugh at you for being so totally misinformed.
 
You people are chiming in without any clue what you are talking about. Mohibur doesn't even realize that this thread is about C# and it's relation to Java/VB... in his world apparently no other language is valid but C. Must be a small world...
 
And you, Aweiwei, think you can toss around some words and put it back on me to prove my point... well... I can do that:
 
Here is why C# is closer to VB.NET than it is to Java:
- C# and VB.Net were developed in parallel specifically for targeting the .Net Framework. VB.Net was developed to allow programmers familiar with the Visual Basic syntax to quickly convert and write applications for .NET. C# was developed to allow programmers familiar with C/C++ to quickly write applications for .NET
- Syntactic sugar are where the differences in the two languages end for all intents and purposes. They both compile to MSIL and they both run on .NET. Save for a few differences (lambda expressions for one), the languages support the same set of features.
- There are many code converters which translate C# to VB.Net and back again. Why can they do this? Because they are the same beyond the syntax and rely on the same base class libraries. I'm not aware of a Java to C# converter.
 
And... just to rub salt in... if C# was so close to Java, why does J# exist? Oh yea... to ease Java developers onto the .NET platform. Although J# never really took off, the question still has to be asked... if C# came from Java then why would MS write J#?
 
Finally, if either of you were informed you would know that there are significant differences in application execution, especially around performance, memory management, and how the garbage collectors work. One could argue those are runtime differences rather than language differences, which is true, but provide more circumstantial evidence that C# does NOT owe its existence to Java.
 
Sorry kids... C# did not come from Java and you have done nothing but reinforce my belief that there is a group of elitist Java people that think computers and modern languages didn't exist until 1995 and that everything which has come since owes its adulation and very existance to Java. A language is a tool... just like a screwdriver or a wrench. And there is a proper one for each problem. (Are you reading this Mohibur?) Arguing about which is better is silly and can left to the young children.
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Solution 2

Remember that these are human languages you're talking about even though we call them computer languages, they're written and read by people. Compare Intel 4004 assembly language from 1974 with ARMv7 and you see the evolution of 'computer' languages.
Human beings haven't evolved since 1970 ( or in fact ever ) and their languages only change slowly. Our languages for describing instructions to computers are a compromise and C based languages have survied in one form or another because they work and because they've been adapated. Take a look at all the changes in the C++11 standard to see what's 'new' to help us cope with ever faster machines and ever bigger software.
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Comments
hor_313 at 6-Feb-13 5:22am
   
so you think C will remaind as first language in future ? and it'll be take how many years to replace it by another?
Matthew Faithfull at 6-Feb-13 5:35am
   
I think C will gradually be replaced by C++ for almost all its uses. I would only expect it to disappear all together when and if computers stop using Von Neumann architecture altogether. When you have a quantum/DNA computer in your mobile phone then maybe C and related languages will be dead.
hor_313 at 6-Feb-13 5:51am
   
and when it will be happen?
Matthew Faithfull at 6-Feb-13 6:00am
   
Futurology is a mugs game when it comes to technology because it depends on so many things. I'm not even sure it will happen but if it does it could be 5 years or take 50. How hard is quantum computing? How long is super string?
Espen Harlinn at 7-Feb-13 16:38pm
   
Well put, Matthew :-D
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Solution 3

Each language has his strong and weak sides. Its interesting that for several years they started to talk about Functional Programming and the benefits about it. There is a possibility that after years the Functional Programming will take big part in the everyday programming. After all its really powerful tool. But this doesn't mean that the rest of the languages will be forgotten. I remember how Pascal was the most used programming language before c++ became so popular. Now even after so many years some people still use it.
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Solution 4

Counter question: Why does not the whole world speak Esperanto[^]?
It's probably individual people's non rational decision behind that.
And: there is no absolut truth in these decisions. Why don't you speak Esperanto? Or do you? Wink | ;-)
Cheers
Andi
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v2
Comments
Marcus Kramer at 6-Feb-13 9:17am
   
Very much like the story of the 1 question philosophy exam: Why?...
My 5, BTW.
Andreas Gieriet at 6-Feb-13 9:58am
   
Thanks for your 5!
Cheers
Andi
nv3 at 6-Feb-13 10:09am
   
I like that answer. It seems to be a popular question for beginners why there is not the one and only perfect programming language. Probably for the same reason why there is not the one and only database system, operating system, ...
Andreas Gieriet at 6-Feb-13 10:45am
   
Yes. Exactly. The one and only car make, coffee brand, ... ;-)
Cheers
Andi
hor_313 at 6-Feb-13 9:45am
   
my mean was that , now is the time for big change in programing or not and we have this situation for many years later as many years ago?
Andreas Gieriet at 6-Feb-13 10:06am
   
As others pointed out: it's a philosophical question to contemplate if there is now time for a cut.
If working in this industry you better learn that reality has nothing to do with "best" solution. Decision makers do not ask for the best solution but rather for a good enough solution based on the given situation/input/people/money available/time available/knowledge available/readiness to divert from the beaten path/... (you name it).
That said, it may seem frustrating from time to time, but that's reality.
Beside that, it's a matter of finding enough "supporters" for a new idea to get forward with that idea (independent of software development).
 
Your question is in that view pointless.
 
Cheers
Andi
hor_313 at 6-Feb-13 11:09am
   
Scientists have always had a weird questions during history
Andreas Gieriet at 6-Feb-13 11:17am
   
So, you are the sientist to ask the question? Or what do you mean by that statement?
I'm a bit confused...
Andi
PS: please click on the "Reply" button on the right top corner of a comment if you want to reply to a specific comments. Helps to follow up...
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Solution 5

What is your definition and understanding of the term - evolution of computer science ? ??? When one programming language is replaced by another , is it a evolution? Then I will say you are too far away from the world of computer science..
 
If you are really interested in knowing where the world of computer science was and where we are today and where we are moving tomorrow, then chech these links
http://www.cs.york.ac.uk/ftpdir/reports/2008/YCS/425/YCS-2008-425.pdf
http://www.cs.rpi.edu/research/pdf/12-03.pdf
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v2
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Solution 6

Which language to pick really depends on what you should do, but it has actually happened a lot since back then. E.g. many modern design patterns should practically be impossible to implement without garbage collectors which most new languages provide. The C++ does still evolve as well but backward comparability is also of importance. The language itself is indeed important but even more important is your theoretical skills. Many of the still used theories in computer science is back from the fifty's.
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