Click here to Skip to main content
Click here to Skip to main content
Add your own
alternative version

Using Resources in the VCF

, 19 Apr 2006
An article on adding and using resources to your application using the VCF.
appresourcesex.zip
AppResources
AppResources.bkl
AppResources.dsp
AppResources.positions
AppResources_cb.cbp
AppResources_icl7.dsp
GNUmakefile
makefile.bcc
makefile.gcc
makefile.vc
Resources
brushed-metal.bmp
de_DE
brushed-metal.bmp
en_US
brushed-metal.bmp
it_IT
brushed-metal.bmp
resourcesex.zip
Resources
GNUmakefile
logo.png
makefile.bcc
makefile.gcc
makefile.vc
Resources
MyData.dat
Resources.strings
Resources.bkl
Resources.dsp
Resources.xcodeproj
Resources_cb.cbp
Resources_icl7.dsp
The Visual Component Framework is a C++ application framework that offers a modern, clean, C++ architecture and is designed to be cross platform. The core framework is divided into three major libraries, the FoundationKit, the GraphicsKit, and the ApplicationKit. The FoundationKit provides basic services such as file access, streams, threads and synchronization primitives, and advanced RTTI features. The GraphicsKit provides a nice set of graphics classes for working with both image and vector graphics, and has built in support for the Anti-Grain Graphics library, as well as image loading services to facilitate loading various graphics formats. Finally, the ApplicationKit provides a rich set of GUI controls, use of the Model-View-Control pattern, property and component editors, undo/redo support, drag-and-drop, and clipboard services, application resources, and UI metrics and policy managers.

To facilitate cross platform functionality the VCF is is built using a system of peer interfaces that abstract away the various platform specific calls, with each peer tackling a specific service, such as as threading, file handling, windowing system controls, and so forth. These peer classes are also exposed, and can be used to get access to the lower level OS handles or primitives that they wrap, allowing the developer to write platform specific code if the need arises.

Finally, the VCF is flexible. While it is certainly designed to be a standalone application framework, it also aims, as much as possible, to cooperate with existing toolkits and/or frameworks. For example, if you have an MFC application, you can easily use just the GraphicsKit to make use of the more advanced features in it, as opposed to using the MFC CDC, CBrush, and CPen drawing classes.

By viewing downloads associated with this article you agree to the Terms of Service and the article's licence.

If a file you wish to view isn't highlighted, and is a text file (not binary), please let us know and we'll add colourisation support for it.

License

This article has no explicit license attached to it but may contain usage terms in the article text or the download files themselves. If in doubt please contact the author via the discussion board below.

A list of licenses authors might use can be found here

About the Author

Jim Crafton
Software Developer (Senior)
United States United States
Currently working on the Visual Component Framework, a really cool C++ framework. Currently the VCF has millions upon millions upon billions of Users. If I make anymore money from it I'll have to buy my own country.

| Advertise | Privacy | Mobile
Web04 | 2.8.140721.1 | Last Updated 19 Apr 2006
Article Copyright 2006 by Jim Crafton
Everything else Copyright © CodeProject, 1999-2014
Terms of Service
Layout: fixed | fluid