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Source Code for JQuery ASP.NET Controls

, 10 Jun 2009 CPOL
Get a start to building your own JQuery Controls
Mullivan.Web.zip
TestApp
App_Data
bin
Meps.Web.dll
Meps.Web.pdb
Mullivan.Web.dll
Mullivan.Web.pdb
TestApp.dll
TestApp.pdb
CSS
images
ui-bg_flat_30_cccccc_40x100.png
ui-bg_flat_50_5c5c5c_40x100.png
ui-bg_glass_20_555555_1x400.png
ui-bg_glass_40_0078a3_1x400.png
ui-bg_glass_40_ffc73d_1x400.png
ui-bg_gloss-wave_25_333333_500x100.png
ui-bg_highlight-soft_80_eeeeee_1x100.png
ui-bg_inset-soft_25_000000_1x100.png
ui-bg_inset-soft_30_f58400_1x100.png
ui-icons_222222_256x240.png
ui-icons_4b8e0b_256x240.png
ui-icons_a83300_256x240.png
ui-icons_cccccc_256x240.png
ui-icons_ffffff_256x240.png
Images
bass.jpg
drums.jpg
guitar.jpg
mic.jpg
piano.jpg
LocalTestRun.testrunconfig
Properties
TestApp.csproj.user
TestResults
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_46_18.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_46_18
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_47_15.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_47_15
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_48_19.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_48_19
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_50_12.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_50_12
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_51_17.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_51_17
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_52_03.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_52_03
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_52_28.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-18 11_52_28
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_04_00.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_04_00
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_25_01.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_25_01
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_25_08.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_25_08
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_25_29.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_25_29
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_26_11.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-19 11_26_11
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-20 13_45_21.trx
Sully_SULLYLAPTOP 2009-05-20 13_45_21
In
SULLYLAPTOP
Out
testproject.dll
TestProject.pdb
TestSecurity.suo
TestSecurity.vsmdi
Mullivan.Web
bin
Debug
Mullivan.Web.dll
Images
calendar.gif
hSliderEnd.gif
hSliderMid.gif
hSliderTab.gif
vSliderEnd.gif
vSliderMid.gif
vSliderTab.gif
JS
Mullivan.snk
Properties
UI
Design
WebControls
WebControls
<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="JQueryTabViewPage.aspx.cs" Inherits="TestApp.JQueryTabViewPage" %>

<%@ Register assembly="Mullivan.Web" namespace="Mullivan.Web.UI.WebControls" tagprefix="cc1" %>

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head runat="server">
    <title>JQuery Tab View</title>
    <link href="/CSS/jquery171.css" type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" />
    <link href="/CSS/JQueryTabView1.css" type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" />
    </head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div >
        <cc1:JQueryTabView ID="JQueryTabView1" runat="server" 
            Width="637px" Sortable="True" SelectionMode="Click" ActiveTabIndex="1" 
            Collapsible="True" >
           <Tabs>
               <cc1:JQueryTab runat="server" Name="Guitars" ImageUrl="~/Images/guitar.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel1"  Height="245px" runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical">
                           The guitar is a musical instrument with ancient roots that is used in a wide 
                           variety of musical styles. It typically has six strings, but four, seven, eight, 
                           ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen and eighteen string guitars also exist. Guitars 
                           are recognized as one of the primary instruments in flamenco, jazz, blues, 
                           country, mariachi, rock music, and many forms of pop. They can also be a solo 
                           classical instrument. Guitars may be played acoustically, where the tone is 
                           produced by vibration of the strings and modulated by the hollow body, or they 
                           may rely on an amplifier that can electronically manipulate tone. Such electric 
                           guitars were introduced in the 1930s and continue to have a profound influence 
                           on popular culture. Traditionally guitars have usually been constructed of 
                           combinations of various woods and strung with animal gut, or more recently, with 
                           either nylon or steel strings. Guitars are made and repaired by luthiers. There 
                           are many brands of guitars, but some commonly known brands are PRS, Gibson, 
                           Dean, Gretsch, Ibanez, Martin, Jackson, Schecter, and Fender.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab runat="server" Name="Drums" ImageUrl="~/Images/drums.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel2" runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           The drum is a member of the percussion group of music instruments, technically 
                           classified as a membranophone. Drums consist of at least one membrane, called a 
                           drumhead or drum skin, that is stretched over a shell and struck, either 
                           directly with parts of a player&#39;s body, or with some sort of implement such as a 
                           drumstick, to produce sound. Other techniques have been used to cause drums to 
                           make sound, such as the &quot;Thumb roll&quot;. Drums are the world&#39;s oldest and most 
                           ubiquitous musical instruments, and the basic design has remained virtually 
                           unchanged for thousands of years. Most drums are considered &quot;untuned 
                           instruments&quot;, however many modern musicians are beginning to tune drums to 
                           songs; Terry Bozzio has constructed a kit using diatonic and chromatically tuned 
                           drums. A few such as timpani are always tuned to a certain pitch. Often, several 
                           drums are arranged together to create a drum kit that can be played by one 
                           musician with all four limbs.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab runat="server" Name="Piano" ImageUrl="~/Images/piano.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   
                   <ContentTemplate>
                   <asp:Button Text="Do Postback and Hold Selected Tab" runat="server" />
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel3"  runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           The piano is a musical instrument which is played by means of a keyboard. Widely 
                           used in Western music for solo performance, ensemble use, chamber music, and 
                           accompaniment, the piano is also very popular as an aid to composing and 
                           rehearsal. Although not portable and often expensive, the piano&#39;s versatility 
                           and ubiquity have made it one of the most familiar musical instruments. Pressing 
                           a key on the piano&#39;s keyboard causes a felt covered hammer to strike steel 
                           strings. The hammers rebound, allowing the strings to continue vibrating at 
                           their resonant frequency.[1] These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge 
                           to a sounding board that couples the acoustic energy to the air so that it can 
                           be heard as sound. When the key is released, a damper stops the string&#39;s 
                           vibration. Pianos are sometimes classified as both a percussion and a stringed 
                           instrument. According to the Hornbostel-Sachs method of music classification, it 
                           is grouped with Chordophones. The word piano is a shortened form of the word 
                           pianoforte, which is seldom used except in formal language and derived from the 
                           original Italian name for the instrument, clavicembalo [or gravicembalo] col 
                           piano e forte (literally harpsichord with soft and loud). This refers to the 
                           instrument&#39;s responsiveness to keyboard touch, which allows the pianist to 
                           produce notes at different dynamic levels by controlling the speed with which 
                           the hammers hit the strings.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab runat="server" Name="Bass" ImageUrl="~/Images/bass.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel4"  runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           The electric bass guitar[1] (also called electric bass,[2][3][4] or simply bass; 
                           pronounced /ˈbeɪs/, as in &quot;base&quot;) is a stringed instrument played primarily with 
                           the fingers or thumb (either by plucking, slapping, popping, tapping, or 
                           thumping), or by using a plectrum. The bass guitar is similar in appearance and 
                           construction to an electric guitar, but with a larger body, a longer neck and 
                           scale length, and usually four strings tuned to the same pitches as those of the 
                           double bass,[5] which correspond to pitches one octave lower than those of the 
                           four lower strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a 
                           transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it 
                           sounds (as is the double bass) in order to avoid the excessive use of ledger 
                           lines. Like the electric guitar, the electric bass guitar is plugged into an 
                           amplifier and speaker for live performances. Since the 1950s, the electric bass 
                           guitar has largely replaced the double bass in popular music as the bass 
                           instrument in the rhythm section. While the types of basslines performed by the 
                           bass guitarist vary widely from one style of music to another, the bass 
                           guitarist fulfills a similar role in most types of music: anchoring the harmonic 
                           framework and laying down the beat. The bass guitar is used in many styles of 
                           music including rock, metal, pop, country, blues and jazz. It is used as a 
                           soloing instrument in jazz, fusion, Latin, funk, and in some rock and metal 
                           (mostly progressive rock and progressive metal) styles.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab runat="server" OnClientTabSelected="__TabChanged" Name="Vocals" 
                   ImageUrl="~/Images/mic.jpg" ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel5"  runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often 
                           contrasted with regular speech. A person who sings is called a singer or 
                           vocalist. Singers perform music known as songs that can either be sung a 
                           cappella (without accompaniment) or accompanied by musicians and instruments 
                           ranging from a single instrumentalist (a duet with a piano) to a full symphony 
                           orchestra or big band. Singing is often done in a group of other musicians, such 
                           as in a choir of singers with different voice ranges, or in an ensemble with 
                           instrumentalists, such as a rock group or baroque ensemble. Nearly anyone who 
                           can speak can sing, since in many respects singing is a form of sustained 
                           speech. Singing can be informal and done for pleasure, for example, singing in 
                           the shower or karaoke; or it can be very formal, as in the case of singing 
                           during a religious ritual such as a Mass or professional singing performances 
                           done on stage or in a recording studio. Singing at a high amateur or 
                           professional level usually requires innate talent, instruction, and regular 
                           practice.[1] Professional singers usually build their careers around one 
                           specific musical genre, such as Classical or rock, they typically take voice 
                           training provided by a voice teacher or vocal coach throughout their career.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab runat="server" ImageHeight="" 
                   ImageWidth="" Name="Winds">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <br />
                       <asp:Button ID="Button1" runat="server" Text="Cause PostBack" />
                       &nbsp;<br />
                       <br />
                       <br />
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
           </Tabs>
        </cc1:JQueryTabView>
        
        <cc1:JQueryTabView ID="JQueryTabView2" runat="server" 
            Width="637px" Collapsible="False" SelectionMode="MouseOver" 
            ActiveTabIndex="0" >
           <Tabs>
               <cc1:JQueryTab ID="JQueryTab1" runat="server" Name="Guitars" ImageUrl="~/Images/guitar.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel6"  Height="245px" runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical">
                           The guitar is a musical instrument with ancient roots that is used in a wide 
                           variety of musical styles. It typically has six strings, but four, seven, eight, 
                           ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen and eighteen string guitars also exist. Guitars 
                           are recognized as one of the primary instruments in flamenco, jazz, blues, 
                           country, mariachi, rock music, and many forms of pop. They can also be a solo 
                           classical instrument. Guitars may be played acoustically, where the tone is 
                           produced by vibration of the strings and modulated by the hollow body, or they 
                           may rely on an amplifier that can electronically manipulate tone. Such electric 
                           guitars were introduced in the 1930s and continue to have a profound influence 
                           on popular culture. Traditionally guitars have usually been constructed of 
                           combinations of various woods and strung with animal gut, or more recently, with 
                           either nylon or steel strings. Guitars are made and repaired by luthiers. There 
                           are many brands of guitars, but some commonly known brands are PRS, Gibson, 
                           Dean, Gretsch, Ibanez, Martin, Jackson, Schecter, and Fender.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab ID="JQueryTab2" runat="server" Name="Drums" ImageUrl="~/Images/drums.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel7" runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           The drum is a member of the percussion group of music instruments, technically 
                           classified as a membranophone. Drums consist of at least one membrane, called a 
                           drumhead or drum skin, that is stretched over a shell and struck, either 
                           directly with parts of a player&#39;s body, or with some sort of implement such as a 
                           drumstick, to produce sound. Other techniques have been used to cause drums to 
                           make sound, such as the &quot;Thumb roll&quot;. Drums are the world&#39;s oldest and most 
                           ubiquitous musical instruments, and the basic design has remained virtually 
                           unchanged for thousands of years. Most drums are considered &quot;untuned 
                           instruments&quot;, however many modern musicians are beginning to tune drums to 
                           songs; Terry Bozzio has constructed a kit using diatonic and chromatically tuned 
                           drums. A few such as timpani are always tuned to a certain pitch. Often, several 
                           drums are arranged together to create a drum kit that can be played by one 
                           musician with all four limbs.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab ID="JQueryTab3" runat="server" Name="Piano" ImageUrl="~/Images/piano.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel8"  runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           The piano is a musical instrument which is played by means of a keyboard. Widely 
                           used in Western music for solo performance, ensemble use, chamber music, and 
                           accompaniment, the piano is also very popular as an aid to composing and 
                           rehearsal. Although not portable and often expensive, the piano&#39;s versatility 
                           and ubiquity have made it one of the most familiar musical instruments. Pressing 
                           a key on the piano&#39;s keyboard causes a felt covered hammer to strike steel 
                           strings. The hammers rebound, allowing the strings to continue vibrating at 
                           their resonant frequency.[1] These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge 
                           to a sounding board that couples the acoustic energy to the air so that it can 
                           be heard as sound. When the key is released, a damper stops the string&#39;s 
                           vibration. Pianos are sometimes classified as both a percussion and a stringed 
                           instrument. According to the Hornbostel-Sachs method of music classification, it 
                           is grouped with Chordophones. The word piano is a shortened form of the word 
                           pianoforte, which is seldom used except in formal language and derived from the 
                           original Italian name for the instrument, clavicembalo [or gravicembalo] col 
                           piano e forte (literally harpsichord with soft and loud). This refers to the 
                           instrument&#39;s responsiveness to keyboard touch, which allows the pianist to 
                           produce notes at different dynamic levels by controlling the speed with which 
                           the hammers hit the strings.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab ID="JQueryTab4" runat="server" Name="Bass" ImageUrl="~/Images/bass.jpg" 
                   ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel9"  runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           The electric bass guitar[1] (also called electric bass,[2][3][4] or simply bass; 
                           pronounced /ˈbeɪs/, as in &quot;base&quot;) is a stringed instrument played primarily with 
                           the fingers or thumb (either by plucking, slapping, popping, tapping, or 
                           thumping), or by using a plectrum. The bass guitar is similar in appearance and 
                           construction to an electric guitar, but with a larger body, a longer neck and 
                           scale length, and usually four strings tuned to the same pitches as those of the 
                           double bass,[5] which correspond to pitches one octave lower than those of the 
                           four lower strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a 
                           transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it 
                           sounds (as is the double bass) in order to avoid the excessive use of ledger 
                           lines. Like the electric guitar, the electric bass guitar is plugged into an 
                           amplifier and speaker for live performances. Since the 1950s, the electric bass 
                           guitar has largely replaced the double bass in popular music as the bass 
                           instrument in the rhythm section. While the types of basslines performed by the 
                           bass guitarist vary widely from one style of music to another, the bass 
                           guitarist fulfills a similar role in most types of music: anchoring the harmonic 
                           framework and laying down the beat. The bass guitar is used in many styles of 
                           music including rock, metal, pop, country, blues and jazz. It is used as a 
                           soloing instrument in jazz, fusion, Latin, funk, and in some rock and metal 
                           (mostly progressive rock and progressive metal) styles.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
               <cc1:JQueryTab ID="JQueryTab5" runat="server" Name="Vocals" 
                   ImageUrl="~/Images/mic.jpg" ImageHeight="15px">
                   <ContentTemplate>
                       <asp:Panel ID="Panel10"  runat="server" ScrollBars="Vertical" Height="245px">
                           Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often 
                           contrasted with regular speech. A person who sings is called a singer or 
                           vocalist. Singers perform music known as songs that can either be sung a 
                           cappella (without accompaniment) or accompanied by musicians and instruments 
                           ranging from a single instrumentalist (a duet with a piano) to a full symphony 
                           orchestra or big band. Singing is often done in a group of other musicians, such 
                           as in a choir of singers with different voice ranges, or in an ensemble with 
                           instrumentalists, such as a rock group or baroque ensemble. Nearly anyone who 
                           can speak can sing, since in many respects singing is a form of sustained 
                           speech. Singing can be informal and done for pleasure, for example, singing in 
                           the shower or karaoke; or it can be very formal, as in the case of singing 
                           during a religious ritual such as a Mass or professional singing performances 
                           done on stage or in a recording studio. Singing at a high amateur or 
                           professional level usually requires innate talent, instruction, and regular 
                           practice.[1] Professional singers usually build their careers around one 
                           specific musical genre, such as Classical or rock, they typically take voice 
                           training provided by a voice teacher or vocal coach throughout their career.</asp:Panel>
                   </ContentTemplate>
               </cc1:JQueryTab>
           </Tabs>
        </cc1:JQueryTabView>
        
        <br />
        <br />
    </div>
    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">

        function __TabChanged(event, ui) {
            alert('Tab ' + ui.panel.id + ' has been selected');
        }
    
    </script>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

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About the Author

Sike Mullivan
Software Developer (Senior)
United States United States
I am a Sr SharePoint Developer in Saint Louis, MO. I've been developing professionally for about four years now. For three years I worked for a Document Imaging company that developed applications for Scanning, Indexing, Migrating, and Searching SharePoint (MOSS, WSS). I'm now working on a team for a Cable company that customizes their internal and external SharePoint implementations.

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