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Posted 4 Jun 2003

An Excellent Reference for Managed C++

, 4 Jun 2003
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Book Review of Programming With Managed Extensions for Microsoft Visual C++.NET 2003

Editorial Note

This article is in the Book Review chapter. Reviews are intended to provide you with information on books - both paid and free - that others consider useful and of value to developers. Read a good programming book? Write a review!

Sample Image - Managed_Extensions.gif
TitleProgramming with Managed Extensions for Microsoft Visual C++.NET 2003
AuthorRichard Grimes
PublisherMicrosoft Press
Published2003
ISBN0735617821
PriceUSD 49.95
Pages583

Review

After developing stand alone Windows applications using Microsoft Visual C++ with MFC for the past several years, the transition to .NET has been frustrating, to say the least. I had purchased a few books on the topic, but starting in on my first production Managed C++ project I found them all lacking in details on the deeper subjects. What is more, Microsoft C++.NET on-line documentation in the MSDN Library was getting hard to wade through. As I’ve done in the past, I decided it was time for another trip to the book store. My hope being, if I can find just ONE book that covers a few of these topics in depth, the money will be well spent. Let me say, I was very excited to pick up Richard Grimes’ book "Programming with Managed Extensions for Microsoft Visual C++.NET", as it has exceeded all my expectations and has become a regular desk reference for this project.

Grimes’ "matter of fact" approach is refreshing and to the point. No sales pitch, no watered down glossing over the details. This book is well written, thorough and easy to understand. Pick a chapter on any topic and you will find a rich discussion with usable example code. In some cases, a subject can be addressed clearly and thoroughly in one paragraph. In other cases, when it takes 3 pages to sufficiently cover a topic, Grimes’ book delivers.

Conclusion

It may be that some or all this information lies buried within the MSDN Library somewhere, but personally, to have a tangible BOOK that I can read through, underline, dog-ear pages and sick yellow post-it notes all over is well worth the money. This is one book that will be well used, and is likely to be one of the more tattered ones on my shelf. I give it an A.

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About the Author

markmalin
Software Developer (Senior)
United States United States
Software developer - Musician - Vacuum tube guitar amp builder. Collector/restorer of antique radios. BMW enthusiast.

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Comments and Discussions

 
QuestionWhy mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
TW6-Jun-03 7:18
memberTW6-Jun-03 7:18 
Did the book reviewed any reason at all, mixing the highly self-contained and meta-driven language like C/C++, to IL => CLR => Fat Framework? Already people complaint about 1MB++ MFC DLL, now MS is offer us a 17MB++ framework. Of course, both of them come with the "latest" Windows OS, I just wonder if I need to patch the framework from 1.0 to X.X, do I need to supply my customer each a 64MB memory stick? Or ask the customer: "Oh, it's FREE from Microsoft web site, download yourself! Better be fast, we don't know when you will be charged!".

The reasons given by Microsoft =>
http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframework/productinfo/topten/

In my opinion, sounds more like to cheer management. It does not review difficulty in porting existing (<= VS6) system to .NET, it does not review .NET application consume a lot more memory then normal application (you know why .NET "proudly" said that the memory routine is faster then C/C++? Because the memory is reserved before you even ask for it, you call this efficient and fast?? Not me.), hardware upgrade etc etc.

The future of VC++ ... =>
http://msdn.microsoft.com/chats/vstudio/vstudio_022703.asp

Is really a heart breaking report. Are we buying VC++ to help Microsoft to conform to C/C++ standard? Or because MFC/ATL help us in many ways to produce efficient WIN32/64 software? While still enjoy programming using C/C++. While internally Microsoft will still use C/C++ (because it is still the best!!!), I bet they have a different set (or similar) of MFC/ATL/WxL?? So for dump customer like me, all I get is a compiler and linker + out dated MFC/ATL, if I want something better, I have to finance myself for Intel C/C++ compiler and buy up-to-date MFC/ATL from www.roguewave.com, DUNDAS???

Did the book also review why .NET could not exposed to C/C++ like GDI+? Instead we must be "garbage collected"? Is it once the number of C/C++ programmers is effectively cut by C#, then probably LINUX will be doomed as well? Oh..I just guess...!

I am not sure about you, or Dr.Grimes, but the C/C++ WINFORM example really make me sick, look at the structure of such source code...I don't call that C/C++ anymore, it looks like a bastard of C and JAVA (Ooops...).

I hope this book answer why people want to mix two incompatible language, different model, different perspective and yet cost so much, at the end not the customer who benefit, but Microsoft, who will still based their product on superiority of C/C++.
AnswerRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Nemanja Trifunovic6-Jun-03 7:45
memberNemanja Trifunovic6-Jun-03 7:45 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
TW7-Jun-03 3:25
memberTW7-Jun-03 3:25 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Anthony_Yio8-Jun-03 18:24
memberAnthony_Yio8-Jun-03 18:24 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
TW9-Jun-03 2:49
memberTW9-Jun-03 2:49 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Anthony_Yio9-Jun-03 16:26
memberAnthony_Yio9-Jun-03 16:26 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Anthony_Yio9-Jun-03 16:40
memberAnthony_Yio9-Jun-03 16:40 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
TW9-Jun-03 23:20
memberTW9-Jun-03 23:20 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Anthony_Yio9-Jun-03 23:26
memberAnthony_Yio9-Jun-03 23:26 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
TW9-Jun-03 23:00
memberTW9-Jun-03 23:00 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Anthony_Yio9-Jun-03 23:18
memberAnthony_Yio9-Jun-03 23:18 
AnswerRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
markmalin6-Jun-03 7:48
membermarkmalin6-Jun-03 7:48 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
Anonymous6-Jun-03 9:11
sussAnonymous6-Jun-03 9:11 
GeneralRe: Why mix C/C++ with .NET? Pin
TW7-Jun-03 3:33
memberTW7-Jun-03 3:33 
GeneralBest MC++ Reference Pin
George L. Jackson6-Jun-03 2:31
memberGeorge L. Jackson6-Jun-03 2:31 

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