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GeneralRe: Take a C Programming Class and Decide After You Complete the Class Pin
Paul Kemner6-Aug-19 7:26
memberPaul Kemner6-Aug-19 7:26 
GeneralRe: Take a C Programming Class and Decide After You Complete the Class Pin
AnotherKen6-Aug-19 10:51
professionalAnotherKen6-Aug-19 10:51 
GeneralRe: Take a C Programming Class and Decide After You Complete the Class Pin
Davie212406-Aug-19 11:07
memberDavie212406-Aug-19 11:07 
GeneralRe: Take a C Programming Class and Decide After You Complete the Class Pin
AnotherKen6-Aug-19 11:14
professionalAnotherKen6-Aug-19 11:14 
GeneralRe: Take a C Programming Class and Decide After You Complete the Class Pin
Davie212406-Aug-19 12:58
memberDavie212406-Aug-19 12:58 
GeneralRe: Questions on getting into the coding world and gig work Pin
Choroid6-Aug-19 8:14
memberChoroid6-Aug-19 8:14 
GeneralRe: Questions on getting into the coding world and gig work Pin
AnotherKen6-Aug-19 11:18
professionalAnotherKen6-Aug-19 11:18 
GeneralRe: Questions on getting into the coding world and gig work Pin
DerekT-P7-Aug-19 0:42
professionalDerekT-P7-Aug-19 0:42 
Hi, member (hint: let us know your name, it will make this a much more personal experience for everyone!)

I've worked in IT over 40 years, now semi-retired. The first 15 I worked as an employee. You get training, holidays, pension, mentoring, but limited opportunity. (I'm talking about larger employers, i.e. those with an IT department). But it's not a job for life - redundancy can hit you whatever field you're in. You can also end up in a "dead-end" job, not learning new skills, and risk getting to a point where you're no longer useful to your employer nor anyone else. I was headed that direction so went "contract": working for 3 - 9 months on each contract, on-site with big companies. It gave me great exposure to many industries, development strategies, tools and environments. After 10 years of that I started picking up what you call "gig" work - working remotely, multiple clients, projects ranging from an hour to three years or more in length. Eventually - with a lot of hard work and even more luck - my income was far more than it could have been as an employee. I'm now semi-retired, expecting a call from a potential new customer in the next hour (recommended by a past client whose systems I still support).

The thing about gig work is that it is inherently unpredictable. You need to be psychic to work out what a buyer might be looking for. You need experience in literally hundreds of different technologies/tools to match the highly specific requirements of the buyer. You are competing not just against a couple of hundred local job-seekers, but against (literally) hundreds of THOUSANDS of other remote-working freelancers across the globe (for many of whom $10/week is a big deal, whereas you need $100/hour just to pay the rent). To break into that marketplace you MUST have either the ability to apply for 100s of gigs per week (and the ability to provide a perfect solution regardless of the tools / vagueness of request); OR you must have a proven track-record of outstanding results. For a while I was the top-ranked UK developer on Rent-a-Coder, and with 100+ 5* reviews I could bid on jobs I wanted and get a very high success rate. But once I'd not picked up any work for a while and dropped to #2, the success rate plummeted. I did a £100 job for a client who couldn't really describe what he needed, he gave me my first-ever 4* rating, and my success rate plummeted even faster. I switched to PeoplePerHour and built up a new reputation there (and picked up my biggest ever client, who then recommended me to others, and I no longer needed to respond to gigs posted on those sites).

If you've got a good education in general IT and development, AND a good portfolio of hobby projects / pro-bono work, AND you can devote 18 hours a day to it, I'd say go for it. But as a newbie, with no experience, no portfolio, a day job (and probably financial responsibility) this is not the way to go. Get a full-time, steady job as a junior developer, find out if you're any good and if you like it. Let someone else pay for your training and build up experience there.

Finally, bear in mind that IT is still generally seen as a young person's career; once you're past 30 you may be expected to take a more managerial role, and find more barriers in your way (though this is where remote working is great - no-one knows how old you are!). It's also an INDOOR job, sitting down - and as a gig worker, generally on your own. You need to be 100% self-reliant, though having said that, join good communities (e.g. CodeProject, and in the UK things like IPSE to look after your business interests. You need to be thoroughly familiar with contract law, employment law, tax law, accounting, marketing and more. You'll be learning new skills + technology continuously and spending a significant amount of your time studying and researching trends for the rest of your career.

Whatever you decide, kudos to you for not just leaping in, but asking the right people in the right places. Best of luck whatever you decide.
Generalugh this is frustrating success and setbacks today Pin
honey the codewitch4-Aug-19 12:31
memberhoney the codewitch4-Aug-19 12:31 
GeneralThe apples are ripe and the plums are red Pin
RickZeeland4-Aug-19 11:01
mveRickZeeland4-Aug-19 11:01 
GeneralRe: The apples are ripe and the plums are red Pin
GenJerDan4-Aug-19 21:09
memberGenJerDan4-Aug-19 21:09 
GeneralRe: The apples are ripe and the plums are red Pin
RickZeeland5-Aug-19 0:15
mveRickZeeland5-Aug-19 0:15 
Generalis this a scrum? Pin
honey the codewitch4-Aug-19 10:01
memberhoney the codewitch4-Aug-19 10:01 
GeneralRe: is this a scrum? Pin
OriginalGriff4-Aug-19 10:17
protectorOriginalGriff4-Aug-19 10:17 
GeneralRe: is this a scrum? Pin
honey the codewitch4-Aug-19 10:18
memberhoney the codewitch4-Aug-19 10:18 
Questionwell, i am about to change reality to fit my code Pin
honey the codewitch4-Aug-19 9:52
memberhoney the codewitch4-Aug-19 9:52 
GeneralWhy TFS Sucks during the week Pin
#realJSOP4-Aug-19 6:33
mve#realJSOP4-Aug-19 6:33 
GeneralRe: Why TFS Sucks during the week Pin
RickZeeland4-Aug-19 7:27
mveRickZeeland4-Aug-19 7:27 
GeneralRe: Why TFS Sucks during the week Pin
rnbergren5-Aug-19 6:02
memberrnbergren5-Aug-19 6:02 
Generaloh yes, this is good. Pin
honey the codewitch4-Aug-19 6:15
memberhoney the codewitch4-Aug-19 6:15 
GeneralRe: oh yes, this is good. Pin
OriginalGriff4-Aug-19 6:20
protectorOriginalGriff4-Aug-19 6:20 
GeneralRe: oh yes, this is good. Pin
honey the codewitch4-Aug-19 6:24
memberhoney the codewitch4-Aug-19 6:24 
GeneralThis is hard: XKCD challenge Pin
OriginalGriff3-Aug-19 21:00
protectorOriginalGriff3-Aug-19 21:00 
GeneralRe: This is hard: XKCD challenge Pin
Kornfeld Eliyahu Peter3-Aug-19 21:29
mveKornfeld Eliyahu Peter3-Aug-19 21:29 
GeneralRe: This is hard: XKCD challenge Pin
RickZeeland3-Aug-19 23:00
mveRickZeeland3-Aug-19 23:00 

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