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I'm struggling with understanding the differences (if they exist) between an Access database (.mdb file) and a SQLite database (.sqlite file).

1) How are they working (ie implementing the database system functionnalities)?
In the case of SQLite, I guess it's the SQLite dll which is processing your data.
For Access, I dunno !
2) Are they similar, or do you need Access on your computer to use an .mdb file in a C++ application?

Edit:
3) Because an Access database needs Jet or ACE, can we say that an Access database file is "embedded"? What is the difference with, say, a PostgreSQL database?
4) Is Access really using Jet, which is deprecated ? Even Access 2016 ? It sounds weird to me...

Thanks !

What I have tried:

Looking around on the internet.
Posted
Updated 1-Feb-18 23:29pm
v5
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Solution 1

Nope. SQlite and Microsoft Access are quite different beasts. See for instance: SQLite is a Self Contained System[^].
   
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Solution 2

Quote:
Are they similar, or do you need Access on your computer to use an .mdb file in a C++ application?

No - you can use an .db without Access instead, though you will need the ACE or JET engine installed.
See Google: .mdb file in a C application - Google Search[^] because the exact details will depend on the type of your app - CLR/.NET apps are very different from MFC for example.
   
Comments
SheepSpeech 31-Jan-18 10:59am
   
Thank you. After my searches, could you answer some new questions I had in mind :
3) Because an Access database needs Jet or ACE, can we say that an Access database file is "embedded"? What is the difference with, say, a PostgreSQL database?
4) Is Access really using Jet, which is deprecated ? Even Access 2016 ? It sounds weird to me...
OriginalGriff 31-Jan-18 11:33am
   
3) No. An embedded resource is internal to the application EXE file, and an embedded database would be ... difficult to modify without annoying anti-virus products.
4) Depends what version of Access the DB file is: early ones are best kept with Jet (which only works in 32 bit), ACE is preferable because it supports all formats and sizes. There are still apps being developed using JET to maintain backwards compatibility with other apps using it.
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Solution 3

MS Access and SQLite are very different indeed but Microsoft SQL Server does offer embeded solutions as well: [^]

...but there are so many different versions its hard to say which one is best and technically most similar to SQLite ...
   

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