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For my school assignment I need to create a function to find Euclidean distance using Cartesian points that are found using a different function.

I got the error
polar_to_cartesian() missing 1 required positional argument: 'R'


Any help is appreciated I feel so dumb and confused

What I have tried:

def polar_to_cartesian(latlon:tuple, R: float):
    """
    Description: Takes in a tuple 'latlon' (latitude and longitude, in radians) and the float 'R' (nonnegative radius of the sphere), returning the cartesian coordinates of the points.
    
    >>> polar_to_cartesian((99, 34), 300)
    (-10.137244625211233, 6.320561508619837, -299.7620502559061)
    
    >>> polar_to_cartesian((22, 56), 4000)
    (-3412.746736059186, 2086.122284215118, -35.4052371616155)
    
    """
    import math
    
    (lat, lon) = latlon
    
    x = R * math.cos(lat) * math.cos(lon)
    y = R * math.cos(lat) * math.sin(lon)
    z = R * math.sin(lat)
    
    return (x, y, z)

# Problem 5.
def distance_Euclidean(points:list, R: float):
    """
    Description: Takes in a list 'points' (2 latitudes, 2 longitudes, all in radians) and the float 'R' (nonnegative radius of the sphere), returning the Euclidean distance between the two points.
    
    >>> distance_Euclidean([(10, 60),(70, 80)], 2000)
    63.245553203367585
    
    >>> distance_Euclidean([(40, 700),(600, 70)], 1000)
    842.9116205154606
    
    """
    import math
    
    [(lat1, lon1), (lat2, lon2)] = points
    
    lat1 = lat1 * (math.pi/180)
    lon1 = lon1 * (math.pi/180)
    lat2 = lat2 * (math.pi/180)
    lon2 = lon2 * (math.pi/180)
    
    (x1, y1, z1) = polar_to_cartesian((points[0], R))
    (x2, y2, z2) = polar_to_cartesian((points[1], R))
    #return math.sqrt((lon2 - lon1)**2 + (lat2 - lat1)**2)
    
    return math.sqrt((x1 - x2)**2 + (y1 - y2)**2 + + (z1 - z2)**2)
Posted
Updated 18-Sep-21 19:59pm

1 solution

Check your brackets:
Python
(x1, y1, z1) = polar_to_cartesian((points[0], R))
(x2, y2, z2) = polar_to_cartesian((points[1], R))
The second set encloses both parametres, making them a single tuple instead of two parameters:
Python
(x1, y1, z1) = polar_to_cartesian(points[0], R)
(x2, y2, z2) = polar_to_cartesian(points[1], R)
Should fix it.
   
v2

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