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Using Visual Basic in Visual Studio
When i write a test program in Visual Studio, and put a break point at a line, the break point works like it did in vb.net

when i load a old vb.net progam in and put a break point, it passes right by that point...

I did find this answer
I went into 'Build', 'Configuration Manager', and Changed the Project's Configuration from 'Release' to 'Debug',

It does work, but it puts the application file in the "Debug" folder, not in the "Release" folder...

what is wrong

What I have tried:

I did find this answer
I went into 'Build', 'Configuration Manager', and Changed the Project's Configuration from 'Release' to 'Debug',

It does work, but it puts the application file in the "Debug" folder, not in the "Release" folder...
Posted
Updated 27-Feb-22 11:15am

Nothing is wrong. That is the expected behavior.
 
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The idea of having the two project configurations "Debug" and "Release" is simple: you have a version you can give to users which you believe is fully working which lives in the "Release/Bin" folder, and a version that you are working on (fixing bugs, adding features that aren't complete yet) which lives in a separate folder "Debug/Bin" so it doesn't corrupt the release version.

The release version doesn't include debug-friendly stuff like source code, and uses different compilation options to produce more efficient final code so you can't easily use a debugger with it.

The debug version includes source and doesn't optimize the output so aggressively so it's possible to execute single lines as well as a pile of other bits to make your debugging life easier.

All you should be doing is developing in Debug, and the when you are happy, build the Release version and give it to users. Then switch back to debug to continue working.
 
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Comments
bugsxx 28-Feb-22 9:05am    
thank you for explaining.....
OriginalGriff 28-Feb-22 9:21am    
You're welcome!

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