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Design a class named ‘Person’ with required personal details and store the details of at least 5 persons. Now find out the eldest among the five persons and display the name of the same [using the overloaded operator ‘<’ or ‘>’]
Input:

Arun

12 5 2002

Banu

11 8 2001

Chitra

5 1 2002

David

14 9 2001

Elan

21 8 2002

 

Output:

Banu

What I have tried:

TRIED JUST TOOK THE INPUT AND SAVED IT.
Posted
Updated 27-May-22 7:30am
Comments
0x01AA 26-May-22 13:09pm    
Quote: "Design a class named ‘Person’ with required personal details and store the details of at least 5 persons"
Mistake: A class Person should hold the data of exactly _one_ person.
To hold several person you should invent something like a class 'Persons'
jeron1 26-May-22 13:48pm    
Do you have a question?

Here's a class definition. You'll have to implement its functions, create its instances, and find the eldest person.
C++
class Person
{
public:
   Person(const std::string& name, int year, int month, int day);
   friend bool operator<(const Person& lhs, const Person& rhs);
private:
   std::string name_;
   int year_;
   int month_;
   int day_;
};
For a discussion of comparison operators like operator<, see the discussion halfway down this page[^]. Bookmark that site, which is my go-to reference for C++.

A good argument can be made that your design should first define a Date class for the year_, month_, and day_ members, so that Person would only have name_ and date_ data members. operator< would then be a member of Date; it makes more sense to compare two dates than it does two people, and the Date class could then also be used by other classes that required a date.
 
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v2
Comments
CPallini 27-May-22 10:46am    
You should also provide the appropriate access specifiers to your class members.
Greg Utas 27-May-22 11:09am    
Grazie. I usually find those details when the compiler complains. :)
I give you an example
C++
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Box
{
  int m_weight;
  //...;

public:
  Box(int weight):m_weight{weight}{}

  friend bool operator < (const Box & first_box, const Box & second_box)
  {
    return (first_box.m_weight < second_box.m_weight);
  }
};



int main()
{
  Box b1(1), b2(2);

  cout << "b1 is" << (b1 < b2 ? " less" : " equal or greater" ) << " than b2\n";
}
 
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When thinking about it I got the idea that you write a Date class which has this operator, so you can write code like this:

C++
if( person1.age() > person2.age() ) {
 print("person: %s is older", person1.fullName() );
}
looks really better than
C++
if( person1 < person2 ) {
 print("person: %s is older", person1.fullName() );
}
because the code is totally explaning that you are comparing their age and not the persons themselfs.

PS: think about the edge case that persons have the totally same age. Like twins ;-)
 
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