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XMLLib for PUGXML with XPath

, 29 Oct 2009 CPOL
A library for PugXML which implements XPath
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		<copyright>Copyright 2003 Richard Chlopan</copyright>
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			<title>All Cats</title>
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			<description>Going to all categories</description>
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			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/archive/../archive/2003_05_01_archive.asp#200322370&quot;&gt;Wednesday, May 21, 2003 8:52 AM&lt;/A&gt;. SEEMS LIKE IT&apos;S ALWAYS SOMETHING, THESE DAYS&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Now Billy Prion&apos;s shown up in Alberta. O well. Pass the, uh, I forget, like the red stuff? To put on this hamburner? Yummy. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;UP THE LINE&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;A talk given at the Directors Guild of America&amp;#146;s Digital Day, Los Angeles, May 17, 2003&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;The story of film begins around a fire, in darkness. Gathered around this fire are primates of a certain species, our ancestors, an animal distinguished by a peculiar ability to recognize patterns.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;There is movement in the fire: embers glow and crawl on charcoal. Fire looks like nothing else. It generates light in darkness. It moves. It is alive.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;The surrounding forest is dark. Is it the same forest our ancestors know by day? They can&amp;#146;t be sure. At night it is another place, perhaps no place at all. The abode of the dead, of gods and demons and that which walks without a face. It is the self turned inside out. Without form, it is that on which our ancestors project the patterns their interestingly mutated brains generate. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;This patterning-reading mutation is crucial to the survival of a species that must ceaselessly hunt, ceaselessly gather. One plant is good to eat; it grows in summer in these lowlands. But if you eat its seedpods, you sicken and die. The big, slow-moving river-animal can be surprised and killed, here in these shallows, but will escape in deeper water. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;This function is already so central, in our ancestors, that they discover the outlines of the water-animal in clouds. They see the faces of wolves and of their own dead in the flames. They are already capable of symbolic thought. Spoken language is long since a fact for them but written language has not yet evolved. They scribe crisscross patterns on approximately rectangular bits of ocher, currently the world&amp;#146;s oldest known human art.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;They crouch, watching the fire, watching its constant, unpredictable movements, and someone is telling a story. In the watching of the fire and the telling of the tale lie the beginning of what we still call film.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Later, on some other night, uncounted generations up the timeline, their descendants squat deep in caves, places of eternal night -- painting. They paint by the less restless light of reeds and tallow. They paint the wolves and the water-animal, the gods and their dead. They have found ways to take control of certain aspects of the cooking-fire universe. Darkness lives here, in the caves; you needn&amp;#146;t wait for dusk. The reeds and tallow throw a steadier light. Something is being turned inside out, here, for the first time: the pictures in the patterning brain are being projected, rendered. Our more recent ancestors will discover these stone screens, their images still expressing life and movement, and marvel at them, and not so long before the first moving images are projected. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;What we call &amp;#147;media&amp;#148; were originally called &amp;#147;mass media&amp;#148;. technologies allowing the replication of passive experience. As a novelist, I work in the oldest mass medium, the printed word. The book has been largely unchanged for centuries. Working in language expressed as a system of marks on a surface, I can induce extremely complex experiences, but only in an audience elaborately educated to experience this. This platform still possesses certain inherent advantages. I can, for instance, render interiority of character with an ease and specificity denied to a screenwriter. But my audience must be literate, must know what prose fiction is and understand how one accesses it. This requires a complexly cultural education, and a certain socio-economic basis. Not everyone is afforded the luxury of such an education. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;But I remember being taken to my first film, either a Disney animation or a Disney nature documentary (I can&amp;#146;t recall which I saw first) and being overwhelmed by the steep yet almost instantaneous learning curve: in that hour, I learned to watch film. Was taught, in effect, by the film itself. I was years away from being able to read my first novel, and would need a lot of pedagogy, to do that. But film itself taught me, in the dark, to view it. I remember it as a sort of violence done to me, as full of terror as it was of delight. But when I emerged from that theater, I knew how to watch film. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;What had happened to me was historically the result of an immensely complex technological evolution, encompassing optics, mechanics, photography, audio recording, and much else. Whatever film it was that I first watched, other people around the world were also watching, having approximately the same experience in terms of sensory input. And that film no doubt survives today, in Disney&amp;#146;s back-catalog, as an experience that can still be accessed.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;That survival, I think, is part of the key to understanding where the digital may be taking us. In terms of most of our life so far, as a species, it&amp;#146;s not a natural thing to see the dead, or hear their voices. I believe the significance of that is still far from being understood. We can actually see what life, at least in some very basic sense, was like, one hundred years ago. We can watch a silent movie, and not only see people who are long dead, but see people who were in their seventies and eighties in the 1920s, and who therefore bore the affect of their developing years -- i.e., from before the Civil War, and earlier. It is as if in 1956 we had been able to watch silent film of, say, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, or the various revolutions of 1848. When the ramifications of this are really thought about, it becomes awesome in almost a religious sense. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Our ancestors, when they found their way to that first stone screen, were commencing a project so vast that it only now begins to become apparent: the unthinking construction of a species-wide, time-defying, effectively immortal prosthetic memory. Extensions of the human brain and nervous system, capable of surviving the death of the individual -- perhaps even of surviving the death of the species. The start of building what would become civilization, cities, cinema. Vast stone calendars, megalithic machines remembering the need to plant on a given day, to sacrifice on another.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;With the advent of the digital, which I would date from, approximately, World War Two, the nature of this project begins to become more apparent, more overt; the texture of these more recent technologies, the grain of them, becomes progressively finer, progressively more divorced from Newtonian mechanics. In terms of scale, they are more akin to the workings of the brain itself.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;All us, creators or audience, have participated in the change so far. It&amp;#146;s been something many of us haven&amp;#146;t yet gotten a handle on. We are too much of it to see it. It may be that we never do get a handle on it, as the general rate of technological innovation shows no indication of slowing. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Much of history has been, often to an unrecognized degree, technologically driven. From the extinction of North America&amp;#146;s mega-fauna to the current geopolitical significance of the Middle East, technology has driven change. (That&amp;#146;s spear-hunting technology for the mega-fauna and the internal-combustion engine for the Middle East, by the way.) Very seldom do nations legislate the emergence of new technologies. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;The Internet, an unprecedented driver of change, was a complete accident, and that seems more often the way of things. The Internet is the result of the unlikely marriage of a DARPA project and the nascent industry of desktop computing. Had nations better understood the potential of the Internet, I suspect they might well have strangled it in its cradle. Emergent technology is, by its very nature, out of control, and leads to unpredictable outcomes.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;As indeed does the emergent realm of the digital. I prefer to view this not as the advent of some new and extraordinary weirdness, but as part of the ongoing manifestation of some very ancient and extraordinary weirdness: our gradual spinning of a sort of extended prosthetic mass nervous-system, out of some urge that was present around the cooking-fires of our earliest human ancestors.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;We call film &amp;#147;film&amp;#148; today in much the same way we &amp;#147;dial&amp;#148; phones, the actual dials being long gone. The fact that we do still employ actual film, in the traditional sense, seems an artifact of platform-transition and industrial economics. I tend to take arguments for the innate esthetic superiority of &amp;#147;film&amp;#148;, with the same grain of salt I reserve for arguments for the innate esthetic superiority of vinyl. Whatever the current shortcomings of the digital image, I imagine there will be digital ways around them. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;But I need to diverge here into another industry, one that&amp;#146;s already and even more fully feeling the historical impact of the digital: music. Prior to the technology of audio recording, there was relatively little one could do to make serious money with music. Musicians could perform for money, and the printing press had given rise to an industry in sheet music, but great fame, and wealth, tended to be a matter of patronage. The medium of the commercial audio recording changed that, and created industry predicated on an inherent technological monopoly of the means of production. Ordinary citizens could neither make nor manufacture audio recordings. That monopoly has now ended. Some futurists, looking at the individual musician&amp;#146;s role in the realm of the digital, have suggested that we are in fact heading for a new version of the previous situation, one in which patronage (likely corporate, and non-profit) will eventually become a musician&amp;#146;s only potential ticket to relative fame and wealth. The window, then, in which one could become the Beatles, occupy that sort of market position, is seen to have been technologically determined. And technologically finite. The means of production, reproduction and distribution of recorded music, are today entirely digital, and thus are in the hands of whoever might desire them. We get them for free, often without asking for them, as inbuilt peripherals. I bring music up, here, and the impact the digital is having on it, mainly as an example of the unpredictable nature of technologically driven change. It may well be that the digital will eventually negate the underlying business-model of popular musical stardom entirely. If this happens, it will be a change which absolutely no one intended, and few anticipated, and not the result of any one emergent technology, but of a complex interaction between several. You can see the difference if you compare the music industry&amp;#146;s initial outcry against &amp;#147;home taping&amp;#148; with the situation today. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Whatever changes will come for film will be as unpredictable and as ongoing, but issues of intellectual property and piracy may ultimately be the least of them. The music industry&amp;#146;s product is, for want of a better way to put it, a relatively simple, relatively traditional product. Audio recordings just aren&amp;#146;t that technology-heavy. Though there&amp;#146;s one aspect of the digital&amp;#146;s impact on music that&amp;#146;s absolutely central to film: sampling. Sampling music is possible because the end-consumer of the product is now in possession of technologies equal or even superior to the technologies involved in producing that product. Human capital (that is, talent) aside, all the end-consumer-slash-creator lacks today, in comparison to a music-marketing conglomerate, is the funds required to promote product. The business of popular music, today, is now, in some peculiarly new way, entirely about promotion.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Film, I imagine, is in for a different sort of ride up the timeline, primarily owing to the technology-intensive nature of today&amp;#146;s product. Terminator III Unplugged is a contradiction in terms. Hollywood is massively and multiply plugged, and is itself a driver of new technologies. The monopoly on the means of production (at least in terms of creation) can be preserved, in this environment, as the industry itself operates on something very near the cutting edge of emergent technology. For a while, at least.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;In terms of the future, however, the history of recorded music suggests that any film made today is being launched up the timeline toward end-user technologies ultimately more intelligent, more capable, than the technologies employed in the creation of that film.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Which is to say that, no matter who you are, nor how pure your artistic intentions, nor what your budget was, your product, somewhere up the line, will eventually find itself at the mercy of people whose ordinary civilian computational capacity outstrips anything anyone has access to today.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Remember the debate around the ethics of colorizing films shot in black-and-white? Colorization, up the line, is a preference setting. Probably the default setting, as shipped from the factory.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;I imagine that one of the things our great-grandchildren will find quaintest about us is how we had all these different, function-specific devices. Their fridges will remind them of appointments and the trunks of their cars will, if need be, keep the groceries from thawing. The environment itself will be smart, rather than various function-specific nodes scattered through it. Genuinely ubiquitous computing spreads like warm Vaseline. Genuinely evolved interfaces are transparent, so transparent as to be invisible. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;This spreading, melting, flowing together of what once were distinct and separate media, that&amp;#146;s where I imagine we&amp;#146;re headed. Any linear narrative film, for instance, can serve as the armature for what we would think of as a virtual reality, but which Johnny X, eight-year-old end-point consumer, up the line, thinks of as how he looks at stuff. If he discovers, say, Steve McQueen in The Great Escape, he might idly pause to allow his avatar a freestyle Hong Kong kick-fest with the German guards in the prison camp. Just because he can. Because he&amp;#146;s always been able to. He doesn&amp;#146;t think about these things. He probably doesn&amp;#146;t fully understand that that hasn&amp;#146;t always been possible. He doesn&amp;#146;t know that you weren&amp;#146;t always able to explore the sets virtually, see them from any angle, or that you couldn&amp;#146;t open doors and enter rooms that never actually appeared in the original film.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Or maybe, if his attention span wavers, he&amp;#146;ll opt to experience the film as if shot from the POV of that baseball that McQueen keeps tossing. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Somewhere in the countless preferences in Johnny&amp;#146;s system there&amp;#146;s one that puts high-rez, highly expressive dog-heads on all of the characters. He doesn&amp;#146;t know that this setting is based on a once-popular Edwardian folk-motif of poker-playing dogs, but that&amp;#146;s okay; he&amp;#146;s not a history professor, and if he needed to know, the system would tell him. You get complete breed-selection, too, with the dog-head setting, but that was all something he enjoyed more when he was still a little kid. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;But later in the afternoon he&amp;#146;s run across something called The Hours, and he&amp;#146;s not much into it at all, but then he wonders how these women would look if he put the dog-heads on them. And actually it&amp;#146;s pretty good, then, with the dog-heads on, so then he opts for the freestyle Hong Kong kick-fest&amp;#133; &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;And what has happened, here, in this scenario, is that our ancient project, that began back at the fire, has come full circle. The patterns in the heads of the ancestors have come out, over many millennia, and have come to inhabit, atemporally, this nameless, single, non-physical meta-artifact we&amp;#146;ve been constructing. So that they form an extension of Johnny&amp;#146;s being, and he accesses them as such, and takes them utterly for granted, and treats them with no more respect than he would the products of his own idle surmise. But he&amp;#146;s still a child, Johnny, and swims unknowing in this, his culture and the culture of his species. He&amp;#146;ll be educated (likely via this same system he plays with now, in a more pedagogical mode -- and likely, without his knowing, it&amp;#146;s already doing that, in background as it were). It may be that he&amp;#146;ll have to be taught to watch films, in the way that we watch them (or watched them, as I think DVD&amp;#146;s are already changing that, not to mention changing the way you approach making them). He may need something akin to the sort of education that I needed in order to read novels -- to appreciate, as it were, a marginalized but still powerfully viable media-platform. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;I can only trust that Johnny&amp;#146;s entertainment system, and the culture that informs it, will be founded on solid curatorial principles. That there will be an ongoing archaeology of media-product in place to insure that someone or something is always there to categorically state, and if necessary to prove, that The Maltese Falcon was shot in black and white and originally starred Humphrey Bogart. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;Because I see Johnny falling asleep now in his darkened bedroom, and atop the heirloom Ikea bureau, the one that belonged to his grandmother, which his mother has recently had restored, there is a freshly-extruded resin action-figure, another instantaneous product of Johnny&amp;#146;s entertainment system. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;It is a woman, posed balletically, as if in flight on John Wu wires. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;It is Meryl Streep, as she appears in The Hours. &lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;She has the head of a chihuahua.&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/blog/blog.asp&quot;&gt;William Gibson&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/21.html#a2187</guid>
			<pubDate>Thu, 22 May 2003 03:34:08 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://ipwebdev.com/weblog/gibson.rss">William Gibson</source>
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			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/21.html#a2181</link>
			<description>&quot;Now what do I do?&quot;.
&lt;P&gt;A friend wrote to me this week to ask, after a fashion, &quot;I&apos;ve got a weblog.&amp;nbsp; Now what do I do?&quot;&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s not often that a blank page gives me a start, but in many ways, hers does (in a good way).&amp;nbsp; I&apos;m tickled that she&apos;s started and I&apos;m a little envious too.&amp;nbsp; Sometimes I wish I had a blank slate on which to start again.&amp;nbsp; &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;This site (&lt;A href=&quot;http://instructionalTechnology.editThisPage.com/&quot;&gt;SiT&lt;/A&gt;) now has a track record, a history, a good number of incoming links, and it has allowed me to build something of a reputation (for &lt;EM&gt;what&lt;/EM&gt; may be a different question).&amp;nbsp; I&apos;ve also tended to stay on topic.&amp;nbsp; The by-product is that it has become set in its ways and those ways are hard to escape from.&amp;nbsp; Even if I tell myself that ultimately I write this for myself, there are a number of important ways in which this is not true.&amp;nbsp; &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;The answer then about what to write about isn&apos;t really as obvious as I first thought and so it&apos;s something I&apos;ve been reflecting upon recently.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;It helps that others are writing about this too.&amp;nbsp; &lt;A href=&quot;http://bsuteacher.blogspot.com/&quot;&gt;Here&lt;/A&gt;&amp;nbsp;(&lt;A href=&quot;http://bsuteacher.blogspot.com/2003_05_11_bsuteacher_archive.html&quot;&gt;archive here&lt;/A&gt;?) a teacher writes about the challenges of using a weblog in a course she&apos;s been taking and with her teaching.&amp;nbsp; &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.hitthosekeys.com/archives/topics/designs.html#p23&quot;&gt;The conversation is synthesized here&lt;/A&gt;.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Admittedly, these kinds of reflections tend to be a dime-a-dozen in weblog-land, so I don&apos;t expect to add much that&apos;s new to the conversation.&amp;nbsp; If you make it to the end though, you may find out more about my intentions for what goes on here.&amp;nbsp; One of the neat things about the internet is that we make mistakes faster and so ideas evolve more quickly, so even if I&apos;m wrong, as long as we adapt and evolve, that&apos;s okay.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;So what am I doing now and how do I want to change it?&amp;nbsp; Typically, I link to a good number of lengthier pieces, but don&apos;t actually put that much effort into reading them.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s hard work sometimes and others often &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.downes.ca/news/OLDaily.htm&quot;&gt;do a better job than I do&lt;/A&gt;.&amp;nbsp; I do get a kick out of putting ideas together, out of creating things, and out of good writing.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;The good writing is often personal writing (or maybe I just like personal writing?).&amp;nbsp; There was a New York Times article last week about people who reveal more details than they really should online.&amp;nbsp; I&apos;ve generally kept away from personal postings here, but if you read &lt;A href=&quot;http://instructionaltechnology.editthispage.com/newsItems/viewDepartment$Site+Notes&quot;&gt;my site notes&lt;/A&gt; you will find some personal notes and opinions.&amp;nbsp; I have written in fairly strong terms occasionally about work-related topics, but again, not about personalities.&amp;nbsp; That said, I&apos;ve basically operated on the assumption that no-one I know in &quot;real life&quot; has paid much, if any, attention to this weblog, including my family.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Recently however, I&apos;ve started to help some friends and colleagues with weblogging and they&apos;ve become aware of my efforts.&amp;nbsp; I&apos;m perfectly fine about that, but it does change the way I feel about what I do here.&amp;nbsp; I think I&apos;m probably more inclined to be even more circumspect about work and family issues, even though those are things I&apos;d like to write about and those are things that I correspond with friends about.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s funny that over two years after &lt;A href=&quot;http://chronicle.com/free/2001/04/2001040301u.htm&quot;&gt;the Chronicle article&lt;/A&gt;, it&apos;s only now that I&apos;m beginning to feel this way.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;All that said, it seems to me that a weblog is necessarily a mixed bag, and I&apos;ve said as much before.&amp;nbsp; It is partly because of the personal writing that people have done on their weblogs that I think I have a better sense of who they are and more respect for their opinions.&amp;nbsp; I like writing about personal issues.&amp;nbsp; I like writing about work issues and projects.&amp;nbsp; I like linking and thinking about the general educational technology issues.&amp;nbsp; This last though is beginning to feel like a less productive use of my time and I&apos;m trying to think through what I want to do next.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;If I want to get more people weblogging at work (which I do), I think it&apos;s time I had a work-log, and (therefore?) perhaps a personal log elsewhere.&amp;nbsp; I am also thinking about making a concerted effort to finish my PhD (if it&apos;s not too late) and starting a site/weblog dedicated to my PhD process - perhaps even using this one (SiT) for that.&amp;nbsp; I&apos;ll say though that even saying something like that is weird.&amp;nbsp; I&apos;m sitting here on the couch in my living room and my wife just asked me what I was doing and I didn&apos;t tell her that idea.&amp;nbsp; I think she&apos;s given up on my ever finishing, but I haven&apos;t quite.&amp;nbsp; At the same time, this is a writing/thinking space and I don&apos;t want to mention ideas that are not concrete right now.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Back to the issue at hand: The overall purpose of what I&apos;m thinking about here is to bring more focus to my (web) work.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;This issue of focus and the emerging categories which I am thinking about has got me thinking of taxonomies.&amp;nbsp; There are lots of natural taxonomies in our daily lives.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s clear that uncovering these taxonomies can be very useful in web design.&amp;nbsp; For example, in terms of their annual evaluation, most faculty have to worry about three things: teaching, professional activities/scholarship and service.&amp;nbsp; I&apos;m suggesting just this kind of taxonomy for a set of personal weblogs that I will maintain: work, professional, community (personal).&amp;nbsp; &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Relatedly, I sat on our Ad Hoc evaluation committee this year and one of my suggestions was that our FAR (faculty activity reports) be online.&amp;nbsp; I thought it would be a fantastic community relations coup and a great way to find out what people actually do with their time (among other things).&amp;nbsp; From the reaction, you&apos;d would think I&apos;d proposed eating children.&amp;nbsp; There were concerns about privacy, which is a little weird to my way of thinking.&amp;nbsp; Assuming that&apos;s a no-go, it&apos;s&amp;nbsp;still the case that&amp;nbsp;that kind of content is what I&apos;d like to see on our web site, even if it doesn&apos;t constitute the FAR.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Let me personalize what I am proposing with a couple of examples:&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;I attended an instructional development symposium this past week.&amp;nbsp; At the symposium I had a good time both personally and professionally.&amp;nbsp; On both fronts, I find that I am inspired by my friends and colleagues to get better at what I do, and to be a better person.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s refreshing to get together with people outside your normal, daily life.&amp;nbsp; It stretches and challenges me.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;On the personal work front, I have had a disappointing week in that I did not get the job which I had applied for.&amp;nbsp; There are things that I would like to write about that process, but knowing that people who I work with (and for) might read it, it would be pretty inadvisable to do so.&amp;nbsp; &lt;EM&gt;Rule of thumb for the internet - sooner or later they will find it&lt;/EM&gt;.&amp;nbsp; The job was one I would have liked to get for personal reasons as much as anything and I still find my current job professionally challenging and satisfying.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;In both cases these are things that I might write about in more detail on a purely personal weblog.&amp;nbsp; I&apos;d like to write about the personal side of the conference, both in terms of the challenges I had and the pleasures of friendship.&amp;nbsp; There are more subtleties than that, but again, this site is beginning to feel as if it&apos;s not the right place to write about that.&amp;nbsp; I also want to respect my friends&apos; privacy.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;So, what next?&amp;nbsp; Many times when you read a screed like this on a weblog, &lt;EM&gt;plus &amp;ccedil;a change, plus c&apos;est la m&amp;ecirc;me chose&lt;/EM&gt;.&amp;nbsp; We will see, but I do occasionally seek to renew myself and this is beginning to feel like the time to do so.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;I would appreciate feedback on these ideas.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;[Note to self - bad writing habit of using parentheses too much (I think?)]&lt;BR&gt;&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://instructionalTechnology.editthispage.com/&quot;&gt;Serious Instructional Technology&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/21.html#a2181</guid>
			<pubDate>Wed, 21 May 2003 16:34:57 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://instructionalTechnology.editthispage.com/xml/scriptingNews2.xml">Serious Instructional Technology</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/05.html#a2102</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.corante.com/amateur/archives20030301.html#26839&quot;&gt;Project Blogging&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;H4&gt;Project Blogging&lt;/H4&gt;
&lt;P&gt;John Udell takes a quick look at how to &lt;A href=&quot;http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/2003/03/27.html&quot; name=http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/2003/03/27.html&gt;re-configure Radio Userland and MovableType for project blogging&lt;/A&gt;.&amp;nbsp; John&apos;s &lt;A href=&quot;http://udell.roninhouse.com/bytecols/2001-05-24.html&quot;&gt;original thoughts about project blogging&lt;/A&gt; are also worth a look.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;While Microsoft Project has become ubiquitous in corporate IT, it is more and more designed to make pretty Gant charts for upper management and is falling behind other tools in the actual management of collaborative software projects.&amp;nbsp; I&amp;nbsp;just found&amp;nbsp;an &lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0105897/stories/2002/11/18/rssFeedForFogbugz.html&quot;&gt;RSS add-on&lt;/A&gt; for &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.fogcreek.com/FogBUGZ/&quot;&gt;Joel&apos;s excellent FogBUGZ system&lt;/A&gt; (a feature &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/&quot;&gt;already in Jira&lt;/A&gt;, and recently added to &lt;A href=&quot;http://sourceforge.net/export/rss2_project.php?group_id=13751&quot;&gt;Source Forge&lt;/A&gt;).&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;It seems that it would be fairly easy to implement an RSS&amp;nbsp;output template for&amp;nbsp;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.mozilla.org/projects/bugzilla/&quot;&gt;BugZilla&lt;/A&gt;.&amp;nbsp; This stuff is doable now, the only question is how much time you&apos;re willing to invest to customize tools in order to implement features that are sure to be common place in development tool suites in the near future.&amp;nbsp; &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;The other question is &quot;what are your project management tools designed for?&quot; - managing source code, managing project resources, managing requirement, enabling team communication, or drawing pretty pictures.&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.corante.com/amateur/&quot;&gt;Corante: Amateur Hour&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/05.html#a2102</guid>
			<pubDate>Mon, 05 May 2003 20:54:45 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/amateur.rss">Corante: Amateur Hour</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/05.html#a2101</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.theshiftedlibrarian.com/2003/05/05.html#a3935&quot;&gt;Corante Goes RSS!&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;P&gt;I&apos;m going to have to find a new site to pick on because the &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.corante.com/&quot;&gt;Corante&lt;/A&gt; posse has hopped on the RSS bandwagon! &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.corante.com/blogging/20030501.shtml#32916&quot;&gt;Full feeds for all of their great blogs&lt;/A&gt;, which I will now actually read! Thanks, Corante!!&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style=&quot;MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px&quot;&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&quot;In news we hope you&apos;ll&amp;nbsp;appreciate: Corante now offers RSS for its blogs!&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/adhominem.rss&quot;&gt;Ad Hominem&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/amateur.rss&quot;&gt;Amateur Hour&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/bottomline.rss&quot;&gt;The Bottom Line&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/brainwaves.rss&quot;&gt;Brain Waves&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/connected.rss&quot;&gt;Connected&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/copyfight.rss&quot;&gt;Copyfight&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/blogging.rss&quot;&gt;Corante on Blogging&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/gotgame.rss&quot;&gt;Got Game&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/ideaflow.rss&quot;&gt;IdeaFlow&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/pipeline.rss&quot;&gt;In the Pipeline&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/livingcode.rss&quot;&gt;Living Code&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/many.rss&quot;&gt;Many-to-Many&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/mooreslore.rss&quot;&gt;Moore&apos;s Lore&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.webcrimson.com/rss/openmind.rss&quot;&gt;Open Mind&lt;/A&gt;&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;We&apos;ll be adding links to them from the respective pages over the course of the day - please alert me to any hiccups you encounter.&amp;nbsp;Huge thanks to the WebCrimson crew!&quot;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/BLOCKQUOTE&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.theshiftedlibrarian.com/&quot;&gt;The Shifted Librarian&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/05/05.html#a2101</guid>
			<pubDate>Mon, 05 May 2003 20:53:09 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.theshiftedlibrarian.com/rss.xml">The Shifted Librarian</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/04/29.html#a2075</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.randgaenge.net/outlines/RadioLinks.html&quot;&gt;Radio UserLand Links Outline&lt;/A&gt;. Thomas N. Burg has a directory of Radio Userland resources sorted into an outline rendered by Radio. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://productnews.userland.com/&quot;&gt;UserLand Product News&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/04/29.html#a2075</guid>
			<pubDate>Tue, 29 Apr 2003 23:36:05 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://productnews.userland.com/xml/rss.xml">UserLand Product News</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/04/27.html#a2067</link>
			<description>&lt;A name=When:1:04:03PM&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://blogs.salon.com/0002007/2003/04/11.html#a166&quot;&gt;Common list&lt;/A&gt; of feature requests for Radio (Jake take note).&amp;nbsp;&lt;A href=&quot;http://scriptingnews.userland.com/2003/04/27#When:1:04:03PM&quot;&gt;&lt;IMG height=9 src=&quot;http://www.scripting.com/images/2001/09/20/sharpPermaLink3.gif&quot; width=6 border=0&gt;&lt;/A&gt; [&lt;A href=&quot;http://scriptingnews.userland.com/&quot;&gt;Scripting News&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/04/27.html#a2067</guid>
			<pubDate>Sun, 27 Apr 2003 22:30:54 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://scriptingnews.userland.com/xml/scriptingNews2.xml">Scripting News</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/04/03.html#a1994</link>
			<description>&lt;IMG height=98 alt=&quot;Cassandra Goth from The Sims&quot; hspace=15 src=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0001015/images/2003/04/01/cassandraGoth.gif&quot; width=36 align=right vspace=5&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.userland.com/startMenuNewsAggregator&quot;&gt;Start Menu News Aggregator for Radio&lt;/A&gt;. If you&apos;re an adventurous guy or gal, you can try out the new Start Menu user interface for the aggregator. I&apos;ve been using it without a glitch for the last couple of days. It&apos;s nice! The caveats are that to configure it (you may not have to) you have to use Radio&apos;s object database, there&apos;s no browser interface. If pressed, I may actually make a Web interface. Also looking for a volunteer to make it work on the Mac (my Mac is in storage in Calif). [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.scripting.com/&quot;&gt;Scripting News&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/04/03.html#a1994</guid>
			<pubDate>Thu, 03 Apr 2003 14:41:36 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.scripting.com/rss.xml">Scripting News</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/31.html#a1970</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.cristianvidmar.com/stories/pms.html&quot;&gt;PHPmySubscriptions&lt;/A&gt; is &quot;a simple tool to read the news of your Radio aggregator on the Web, when you are away from your Radio.&quot; [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.scripting.com/&quot;&gt;Scripting News&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/31.html#a1970</guid>
			<pubDate>Mon, 31 Mar 2003 15:40:23 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.scripting.com/rss.xml">Scripting News</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/25.html#a1925</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://weblog.delacour.net/archives/000871.html&quot;&gt;The unbearable heaviness of babble&lt;/A&gt;. I&apos;ve been meaning to write about Liz&apos;s extroversion post ever since Phil Ringnalda pointed to it at the beginning of the month. Though Phil doesn&apos;t reveal precisely what Liz revealed &quot;about extroverts that has baffled [him] for years,&quot; her post confirmed what I&apos;d long suspected: that extroverts don&apos;t know what... [&lt;A href=&quot;http://weblog.delacour.net/&quot;&gt;Jonathon Delacour&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/25.html#a1925</guid>
			<pubDate>Tue, 25 Mar 2003 15:04:59 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://weblog.delacour.net/index.xml">Jonathon Delacour</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/25.html#a1923</link>
			<description>&lt;P&gt;Chris Pirillo sent me to the &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.feedroom.com/rssmain.jsp&quot;&gt;feedroom&lt;/A&gt;. Oh, that&apos;ll keep me busy for a while.&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0001011/&quot;&gt;The Scobleizer Weblog&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/25.html#a1923</guid>
			<pubDate>Tue, 25 Mar 2003 13:56:11 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://radio.weblogs.com/0001011/rss.xml">The Scobleizer Weblog</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/25.html#a1921</link>
			<description>&lt;IMG src=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/images/fotoecken/topright.gif&quot; align=right&gt;&lt;IMG hspace=-20 src=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/images/fotoecken/topleft.gif&quot; align=left&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BIG&gt;&lt;BIG&gt;F&lt;/BIG&gt;&lt;/BIG&gt;otoecken: The surface of 101-365 is pretty slick, so I use plastic, triangular shaped corners to keep the pictures from sliding down the page. If you&apos;d like to use corners for your own pictures, here&apos;s how:*&lt;SMALL&gt;
&lt;OL&gt;
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;B&gt;Create a picture&lt;/B&gt; to be framed and &lt;B&gt;size it for your page.&lt;/B&gt;
&lt;LI&gt;Add an optional white frame and shadow as &lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/2002/10/11.html#a179&quot;&gt;discussed before&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;LI&gt;Enlarge the &lt;B&gt;Canvas Size&lt;/B&gt; by about 40 pixels in both the horizontal and vertical directions, or to a minimum of 410 by 410 pixels for enough working room.
&lt;LI&gt;If you haven&apos;t already, &lt;A href=&quot;http://homepage.mac.com/cheilman1/images/fotoecken.psd&quot;&gt;download the images&lt;/A&gt; of the plastic corners.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;B&gt;Open the file&lt;/B&gt; &apos;fotoecken.psd&apos; with Photoshop.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;B&gt;Select All,&lt;/B&gt; then &lt;B&gt;Copy&lt;/B&gt; the fotoecken image.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;B&gt;Paste&lt;/B&gt; the fotoecken image into a new layer of your picture.
&lt;LI&gt;Using the &lt;B&gt;Marquee Tool,&lt;/B&gt; select a corner.
&lt;LI&gt;Move the selected corner with the &lt;B&gt;Move Tool&lt;/B&gt; to the coresponding corner of your picture. Position the corner image snuggly onto the corner of your picture. The transparency of the corners is built in to the fotoecken.psd file.
&lt;LI&gt;Repeat steps 8 and 9 for the remaining corners.
&lt;LI&gt;In the layer with the fotoecken, &lt;B&gt;Select All,&lt;/B&gt; then &lt;B&gt;nudge&lt;/B&gt; the layer up then down to tighten the selection around the limits of the corners.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;B&gt;Crop&lt;/B&gt; the picture to the selection - it should perfectly contain the fotoecken.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;B&gt;Save for Web&lt;/B&gt; and you&apos;re done! &lt;/LI&gt;&lt;/OL&gt;&lt;/SMALL&gt;&lt;IMG src=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/images/fotoecken/bottomright.gif&quot; align=right&gt;&lt;IMG hspace=-20 src=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/images/fotoecken/bottomleft.gif&quot; align=left&gt;&lt;SMALL&gt;*&lt;SMALL&gt;I use Photoshop 7 for OS X, this may also work on other software.&lt;/SMALL&gt;&lt;/SMALL&gt; [&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/&quot;&gt;101-365&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/25.html#a1921</guid>
			<pubDate>Tue, 25 Mar 2003 13:46:25 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://radio.weblogs.com/0101365/rss.xml">101-365</source>
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			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/24.html#a1916</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://bgbg.blogspot.com#200034238&quot;&gt;Tip Your Servers&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;P&gt;I thought &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.rebeccablood.net/&quot;&gt;Rebecca Blood&apos;s&lt;/A&gt; &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.rebeccablood.net/handbook/&quot;&gt;Weblog Handbook&lt;/A&gt; was full of great advice and insights, and now she has a slimmed down version&amp;#151;all the flavor, half the calories: &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/ten_tips.html&quot;&gt;Ten Tips For A Better Weblog&lt;/A&gt;. [via &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.dashes.com/links/&quot;&gt;Anil&apos;s Daily Links&lt;/A&gt;]&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://bgbg.blogspot.com&quot;&gt;Bag and Baggage&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/03/24.html#a1916</guid>
			<pubDate>Mon, 24 Mar 2003 16:04:24 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://bgbg.blogspot.com/rss/bgbg.xml">Bag and Baggage</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/02/12.html#a1829</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.wealthbondage.com/2003/02/12.html#a198&quot;&gt;The Blog Reader/Writer Contract&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;EM&gt;Posted by &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.wealthbondage.com/stories/2002/12/01/theHappyTutor.html&quot;&gt;The Happy Tutor&lt;/A&gt; &lt;IMG height=72 alt=&quot;A picture named Happy Tutor.jpg&quot; hspace=15 src=&quot;http://www.wealthbondage.com/images/2002/12/27/Happy%20Tutor.jpg&quot; width=75 align=right vspace=5 border=0&gt;&lt;/EM&gt;&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Every genre has an implicit &quot;contract&quot; between writer and reader. &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;OL&gt;
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;STRONG&gt;Lecture&lt;/STRONG&gt; - I talk you listen; I make it worth your while.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;STRONG&gt;Roundtable discussion&lt;/STRONG&gt; - We take turns talking and pretend to listen.
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;STRONG&gt;Panel &lt;/STRONG&gt;- We take turns talking and we and the audience pretend to listen
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;STRONG&gt;Questions from Audience&lt;/STRONG&gt; - Any of the above with questions from &quot;the peanut gallery.&quot;
&lt;LI&gt;&lt;STRONG&gt;Blogs?&lt;/STRONG&gt;&amp;nbsp;The deal, I think, is this: I will pretend to read your crap; if you will pretend to read mine. Instead of&amp;nbsp;showing up and nodding, half-asleep to show you are&amp;nbsp;paying attention, as in a small group discussion or panel, in blogs your presence shows up in the referrals links, and your polite attention is shown in an occasional comment or link. &lt;/LI&gt;&lt;/OL&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Blogs as peer to peer, many to many, communication don&apos;t scale well. I can only read so much crap, in order to get others to read mine. At some point I have to read those who, unlike &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.wealthbondage.com/stories/2002/12/01/theHappyTutor.html&quot;&gt;The Happy Tutor&lt;/A&gt; and his blogroll have something important to say. &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;STRONG&gt;A-List Blogs&lt;/STRONG&gt;&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;When a Blogger goes A-list, he or she is more like a lecturer, or a lecture plus panel. He or she takes questions on the fly, and plays off remarks from the audience, but, basically, the job is to hold forth, and duly recognize, as does any official, the efforts of the little people, who made your success possible. &lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;A-list blogs at their best are our &quot;representatives;&quot; they speak not only too us, but for us, like G.W. Bush. &lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.wealthbondage.com/&quot;&gt;Wealth Bondage&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/02/12.html#a1829</guid>
			<pubDate>Wed, 12 Feb 2003 20:02:45 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.wealthbondage.com/rss.xml">Wealth Bondage</source>
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			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/02/10.html#a1815</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.corante.com/copyfight/20030201.shtml#20871&quot;&gt;Corante: Weblogs in Higher Education&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;P&gt;&lt;I&gt;Quote:&lt;/I&gt; &quot;It&apos;s time for some radical approaches to teaching and learning. I don&apos;t mean radical as in &quot;cutting edge technology.&quot; I mean radical as in &quot;to-the-root.&quot; Largely self-driven, apprentice-style. With everyone able to join the conversation, a built-in incentive to participate and (a few) natural filtering mechanisms.&quot;&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;EM&gt;Comment: &lt;/EM&gt;There are a number of tempting projects out there right now, but ...&lt;EM&gt;must keep focus...&lt;/EM&gt; my main project at work is working out how to get more going at our college.&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://instructionalTechnology.editthispage.com/&quot;&gt;Serious Instructional Technology&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/02/10.html#a1815</guid>
			<pubDate>Mon, 10 Feb 2003 18:55:37 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://instructionalTechnology.editthispage.com/xml/scriptingNews2.xml">Serious Instructional Technology</source>
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		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/15.html#a1727</link>
			<description>&lt;P&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.scriptygoddess.com/archives/003255.php&quot;&gt;Textile: Text to HTML Converter&lt;/A&gt;&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style=&quot;MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px&quot;&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&quot;While visiting &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.textism.com/&quot;&gt;Textisim&lt;/A&gt; I read of the release of a &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.textism.com/tools/textile/index.html&quot;&gt;Textile&lt;/A&gt;, a web page that will convert plain text to HTML.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;The author, Dean Allen, says: &lt;EM&gt;&apos;...one should now be able to paste in text copied from a word processor on any platform, and see proper corresponding HTML entities in the result.&apos;&lt;/EM&gt;&quot; [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.scriptygoddess.com/&quot;&gt;scriptygoddess.com&lt;/A&gt;]&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/BLOCKQUOTE&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.theshiftedlibrarian.com/&quot;&gt;The Shifted Librarian&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/15.html#a1727</guid>
			<pubDate>Wed, 15 Jan 2003 07:09:40 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.theshiftedlibrarian.com/rss.xml">The Shifted Librarian</source>
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		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/10.html#a1711</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.dangerousmeta.com&quot;&gt;garret&lt;/A&gt;. For some reason &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.dangerousmeta.com&quot;&gt;garret&lt;/A&gt;&apos;s &lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0001246/gthemes/&quot;&gt;Radio themes&lt;/A&gt; don&apos;t appear in the list at the &lt;A href=&quot;http://themes.userland.com/&quot;&gt;Userland Theme site&lt;/A&gt;. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.vfth.com/&quot;&gt;ViewFromTheHeart&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/10.html#a1711</guid>
			<pubDate>Sat, 11 Jan 2003 04:22:05 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.vfth.com/xml/rss.xml">ViewFromTheHeart</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/06.html#a1688</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.loftesness.com/radio/2002/01/01.html&quot;&gt;One year of Radio Userland!&lt;/A&gt;. A &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.loftesness.com/radio/2002/01/01.html&quot;&gt;year&lt;/A&gt; has gone by since I started using &lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.userland.com/&quot;&gt;Radio UserLand&lt;/A&gt; in earnest for this weblog. I just paid the annual renewal fee (and helped the Userland gang debug their renewal software in the process!). I&apos;m not using the Userland servers for hosting any of my weblogs any more -- but the software is still evolving and it&apos;s worth it to stay current on maintenance. On balance, Radio does most everything I need. It&apos;s still quirky (especially the FTP upstreamer who has to be stroked to stay alive). I&apos;d still like some new features (e.g., referer logs in XML, a daily email distribution capability for weblog subscribers who don&apos;t want to mess with RSS, built-in &quot;on this day&quot; support), lower memory and CPU utilization, etc. But, overall, it&apos;s been a great tool to have in the toolbox. I&apos;ve looked at some other weblog tools -- Movable Type and Blosxom most recently. But I&apos;ll likely stay with Radio. At this point, we&apos;re a bit like an crotchety old couple -- we&apos;ve lived together for quite a while now and breaking up would be hard to do. If you&apos;re interested in &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.loftesness.com/radio/stories/2002/01/20/notesOnRadioCustomization.html&quot;&gt;living with Radio Userland&lt;/A&gt;, I&apos;ve logged my notes &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.loftesness.com/radio/stories/2002/01/20/notesOnRadioCustomization.html&quot;&gt;here&lt;/A&gt; re: adapting it to my needs over the last year. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.loftesness.com/radio/&quot;&gt;Scott Loftesness&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/06.html#a1688</guid>
			<pubDate>Mon, 06 Jan 2003 16:10:59 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.loftesness.com/radio/rss.xml">Scott Loftesness</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/04.html#a1677</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.kuro5hin.org/?op=displaystory;sid=2003/1/4/125411/1900&quot;&gt;The ethics of linkage&lt;/A&gt;. If you read &quot;meta&quot; sites like Slashdot, Kuro5hin, Fark, Met4filter (natch), and Memepool you&apos;ve probably encountered links to stories that you can&apos;t reach -- namely because the act of linking to a server not prepared for massive traffic has brought down the server, or worse, put the hapless soul over their bandwidth cap denying any use to anyone for the rest of the month or day or whatever time period the ISP or hosting provider uses to allocate bandwidth. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.kuro5hin.org/&quot;&gt;kuro5hin.org&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/04.html#a1677</guid>
			<pubDate>Sun, 05 Jan 2003 03:11:54 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.kuro5hin.org/backend.rdf">kuro5hin.org</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/04.html#a1674</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.russellbeattie.com/notebook/index.jsp?date=20030104#162542&quot;&gt;Expat Bloggers Unite&lt;/A&gt;. I was just checking my referrers and noticed the &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.grewe.co.uk/blogging-abroad.shtml&quot;&gt;Blogging Abroad&lt;/A&gt; page which lists a bunch of Expat Bloggers like myself. Very cool!
&lt;P&gt;It&apos;s actually well done, with little flags of the nationalities of each blogger and the countries they&apos;re in now. I&apos;m sure there&apos;s a lot more expat bloggers out there, though... hopefully the list&apos;ll grow. It&apos;d be nice to see an OPML list of these blogs, or aggregated like JavaBlogs.com. I&apos;ll have to go through the list to see which ones I want to add to Russell&apos;s Blog Roll v2003.
&lt;P&gt;Actually... this is Yet Another Cool Blog Idea. Just like JavaBlogs.com aggregates those bloggers who share a certain theme - there could be a site that allows bloggers to organize themselves like that. &quot;bGroups.org&quot; could provide the same services, if you think about it. Bloggers could go and sign themselves up for certain categories and then see pages aggregated for that group, download blogrolls, etc. Maybe this already exists?
&lt;P&gt;-Russ [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.russellbeattie.com/notebook/&quot;&gt;Russell Beattie Notebook&lt;/A&gt;]&lt;/P&gt;</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/04.html#a1674</guid>
			<pubDate>Sat, 04 Jan 2003 16:59:20 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.russellbeattie.com/notebook/rss.jsp">Russell Beattie Notebook</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/02.html#a1670</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://coolstop.com/radio/2003/01/01.shtml#a2040&quot;&gt;Where am I? (Part 2)&lt;/A&gt;. &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.geourl.org/&quot;&gt;GeoURL ICBM Address Server&lt;/A&gt;&amp;nbsp;results:&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://geourl.org/near/?p=http://coolstop.com/radio/&quot;&gt;sites near jenett.radio and within 500 miles&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.acme.com/mapper/mapper.cgi?lat=42.658345&amp;amp;long=-83.2374889999999&amp;amp;scale=13&amp;amp;theme=Image&amp;amp;width=3&amp;amp;height=2&amp;amp;dot=Yes&quot;&gt;jenett.radio&apos;s coordinates on an aerial map&lt;/A&gt;&lt;BR&gt;&lt;BR&gt;I&apos;m also subscribed to a &lt;A href=&quot;http://geourl.org/rss091/?p=http://coolstop.com/radio/&quot;&gt;feed&lt;/A&gt; of the search results so that when a new site shows up near me, I&apos;ll see it in the ol&apos; aggregator.&amp;nbsp; How cool!&amp;nbsp; Go &lt;A href=&quot;http://geourl.org/add.html&quot;&gt;add your site&lt;/A&gt; to the database if you haven&apos;t yet.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s easy. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://coolstop.com/radio/&quot;&gt;jenett.radio&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2003/01/02.html#a1670</guid>
			<pubDate>Thu, 02 Jan 2003 19:28:58 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://coolstop.com/radio/rss.xml">jenett.radio</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/12/15.html#a1595</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0107808/2002/12/12.html#a637&quot;&gt;Did you hear something?&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style=&quot;MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px&quot;&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://weblog.halmacomber.com/#90003486&quot;&gt;Reduce Project Variability...Start Listening&lt;/A&gt;. I&apos;ve been teaching listening from the time I started teaching project management. Invariably, a large percentage (often a great majority) of the sources of mis-coordination on projects is the result of project participants not listening. Mis-listening just adds to the variability and uncertainty on our projects. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://weblog.halmacomber.com/&quot;&gt;Reforming Project Management&lt;/A&gt;]&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/BLOCKQUOTE&gt;
&lt;P&gt;With thanks to &lt;A href=&quot;http://dijest.com/aka/&quot;&gt;Phil&lt;/A&gt; for rsstroducing me to Hal&apos;s blog and to a great post.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s also a great advert for k-logs since reading k-logs is all about listening.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;Was it Phil who, a little while ago, advised the idea of using k-logs to let projects &lt;EM&gt;fail fast&lt;/EM&gt;.&amp;nbsp; Reading the k-logs of the people on the team (or perhaps a consolidated feed built from &amp;amp; filtered out of their individual feeds) is a key aspect of how you understand what is happening on the project, how you can tell if it is failling and understand the issues.&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;I&apos;ve pondered risk management in projects before.&amp;nbsp; No project worth doing comes without risks and the challenge is often to understand what the real risks are and to spot them in time to do something about them.&amp;nbsp; Again, this is listening.&amp;nbsp; How can you sense when a risk is rearing it&apos;s head for real?&amp;nbsp; How can you tell when a new issue is emerging that should make it onto your list?&lt;/P&gt;
&lt;P&gt;If listening is the stethoscope then k-logs are the heartbeat (...too much? :-) )&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0107808/&quot;&gt;Curiouser and curiouser!&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/12/15.html#a1595</guid>
			<pubDate>Sun, 15 Dec 2002 23:26:40 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://radio.weblogs.com/0107808/rss.xml">Curiouser and curiouser!</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/11/30.html#a1552</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0107808/2002/11/30.html#a592&quot;&gt;Tracking the link cosmos&lt;/A&gt;.
&lt;BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style=&quot;MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px&quot;&gt;
&lt;P&gt;&lt;A href=&quot;http://ming.tv/flemming2.php/__show_article/_a000010-000307/&quot;&gt;Technorati&lt;/A&gt;. &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.technorati.com&quot; target=_blank&gt;technorati.com&lt;/A&gt; is the best site I&apos;ve seen sofar for showing who links to who&apos;s weblogs. Well, mainly I&apos;m interested in who links to what on MY log, mostly to see which stories worked well, and to discover new friends who are exploring similar topics. The other sites that attempt to show connections between weblogs have sofar not shown me much more than I already knew, but in my &lt;A href=&quot;http://www.technorati.com/cosmos/links.html?rank=&amp;amp;url=ming.tv&amp;amp;sub=Get+Link+Cosmos&quot; target=_blank&gt;technorati listing&lt;/A&gt; I right away get to know some new people. And it is great that in this world, plagiarism is flattery. And a way of voting. I copy somebody else&apos;s story, and somebody else copies my copy, and that shows that all of us found it important and interesting. [&lt;A href=&quot;http://ming.tv/&quot;&gt;Ming&apos;s Metalogue&lt;/A&gt;]&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/BLOCKQUOTE&gt;
&lt;P&gt;I too have become interested in Technorati.&amp;nbsp; It&apos;s like TrackBack in reverse and let&apos;s me find where the idea flow that I am participating in has reached in a more concrete fashion than Organica &amp;amp; EcoSystem.&lt;/P&gt;[&lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0107808/&quot;&gt;Curiouser and curiouser!&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/11/30.html#a1552</guid>
			<pubDate>Sun, 01 Dec 2002 04:01:28 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://radio.weblogs.com/0107808/rss.xml">Curiouser and curiouser!</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/11/26.html#a1535</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://bgbg.blogspot.com/2002_11_17_bgbg_archive.html#85706144&quot;&gt;Mickey Kaus&lt;/A&gt;: &quot; In blogging, you don&apos;t do it once, you do it repeatedly. You don&apos;t do it right, but through feedback you eventually get it right.&quot; &lt;I&gt;Exactly.&lt;/I&gt; [&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.scripting.com/&quot;&gt;Scripting News&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/11/26.html#a1535</guid>
			<pubDate>Tue, 26 Nov 2002 15:57:36 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://www.scripting.com/rss.xml">Scripting News</source>
			</item>
		<item>
			<link>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/11/21.html#a1524</link>
			<description>&lt;A href=&quot;http://coolstop.com/radio/2002/11/21.shtml#a1753&quot;&gt;absolutely the definitive resource on building a web page...&lt;/A&gt;. &lt;A href=&quot;http://radio.weblogs.com/0105617/2002/11/20.html#a280&quot;&gt;Michael Britten&lt;/A&gt;:&amp;nbsp; &quot;&lt;A href=&quot;http://www.homestarrunner.com/sbemail51.html&quot;&gt;so you wanna build a web page, eh?&lt;/A&gt;&amp;nbsp; &quot;I don&apos;t post technical information on this site.&amp;nbsp; But this is the best instruction on the&amp;nbsp;subject I&apos;ve ever seen.&amp;nbsp;Worthwhile for all levels of experience, it completely demystifies the subject...&quot; [&lt;A href=&quot;http://coolstop.com/radio/&quot;&gt;jenett.radio&lt;/A&gt;]</description>
			<guid>http://radio.weblogs.com/0114013/categories/radioAndBlog/2002/11/21.html#a1524</guid>
			<pubDate>Thu, 21 Nov 2002 19:41:31 GMT</pubDate>
			<source url="http://coolstop.com/radio/rss.xml">jenett.radio</source>
			</item>
		</channel>
	</rss>

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