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Using Visual Studio AutoRecover to Avoid Losing Your Work (and your Mind)

, 30 Jul 2014 CPOL 4.1K 3
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If you have ever worked in an environment that may not have been the most reliable or you are simply a worry-wart when it comes to possible data loss, then this might be for you. When discussing a recurring issue with another developer, he complained that his older computer frequently crashed which

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If you have ever worked in an environment that may not have been the most reliable or you are simply a worry-wart when it comes to possible data loss, then this might be for you.

When discussing a recurring issue with another developer, he complained that his older computer frequently crashed which resulted in him losing data quite often. He didn’t seem to be aware of a feature within Visual Studio called AutoRecover that would help him ensure that his data wasn’t always “gone forever”. While it typically works on it’s own, this post will discuss AutoRecover, configuring it and locating all of the temporary files it creates if you need to find them.

What is AutoRecover?

AutoRecover is an option within Visual Studio that will allow you to define a particular interval in which to save information about all of the files that may be changing or have changed within your application. It’s perfect for scenarios where you might have a machine that is on the verge of death, intermittent power issues, data-loss anxiety and just about anything else that might have you spouting off expletives when your screen goes black (or blue).

How do I use it?

You can access the AutoRecover option in Visual Studio through the following steps :

  1. Select Tools from the Toolbar in Visual Studio.
  2. Choose Options
  3. Select AutoRecover beneath the Environment tab on the right.

You’ll then be presented with the AutoRecover dialog box :

Autorecover

You’ll just need to adjust these values depending on your needs and how erratic your machine can be.

Accessing AutoRecover Files

Accessing the files themselves is quite easy as well. By default, Visual Studio will store all of these files within a “Backup Files” directory which is typically located at the following location :

<span class="pun">~</span><span class="str">/Documents/{Your Version of Visual Studio}</span><span class="pun">/</span><span class="typ">Backup </span><span class="typ">Files</span><span class="pun">/{Your Project Name}</span>

Within this folder, you will see a collection of files that are both original and those that have been previously recovered as seen below :

files

Visual Studio will typically prompt you to open these files if your system experienced an unexpected shut down when opening an affected solution or project, but this should provide an easy way to access these files if things do go horribly wrong.

License

This article, along with any associated source code and files, is licensed under The Code Project Open License (CPOL)

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About the Author

Rion Williams
Software Developer (Senior)
United States United States
An experienced Software Developer and Graphic Designer with an extensive knowledge of object-oriented programming, software architecture, design methodologies and database design principles. Specializing in Microsoft Technologies and focused on leveraging a strong technical background and a creative skill-set to create meaningful and successful applications.

Well versed in all aspects of the software development life-cycle and passionate about embracing emerging development technologies and standards, building intuitive interfaces and providing clean, maintainable solutions for even the most complex of problems.
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