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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
PIEBALDconsult29-Mar-19 11:14
professionalPIEBALDconsult29-Mar-19 11:14 
GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
GuyThiebaut28-Mar-19 21:33
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
dandy7229-Mar-19 6:47
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
GuyThiebaut29-Mar-19 7:44
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
dandy7230-Mar-19 5:18
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
Member 916705728-Mar-19 21:36
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
rtischer827729-Mar-19 2:04
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
Member 798912229-Mar-19 2:40
MemberMember 798912229-Mar-19 2:40 
We could make long strides by simply using what we've got in much more sensible ways than we do!

I regularly get into discussions with CLI affectionadas (read: Linux people) who insist that workin in a CLI is so much faster, sometimes they say "streamlined", than a GUI. To illustrate it, they pick up some terribly designed GUI where you have to jump from tabcard to the other, type in by hand a word for 1-in-n selections, it remembers nothing of preferences, etc. etc. I have seen input fields tagged by the single-character CLI option letter, rather than a text indicating what the value represents!

Why should a software developer be bothered by learning anything in the application domain, about work patterns, terminologies and how things looked and are operated outside the computer? An example: When I needed a sound editor, I ended up on Steinberg Wavelab, and a number of my friends and colleagues screamed out: Why do you waste your money on that? Couldn't you use Audacity? (or Cool Edit or this or that) I force them down on a chair in front of my PC, and show them: To do so&so, here is how I do it in Wavelab ... And here is what I have to do in the system you argue for. To do this&that, here is WaveLab ... and here is yours. Wavelab was developed by people who know how the tools are used, which operations must be easily accessible, how the normal workflow is. That is why I chose Wavelab over the cheaper/free alternatives.

It repeats with all kinds of software. Photoshop didn't become the leader beacause of functional features (Gimp wasn't that far behind!), but because things "feel right" when you work in it.

Even document editing: MS Word is developed based on tons of logs of how the users work - where do they make mistakes? Where do they spend more time to do an operation strictly necessary? Which features are used most frequently and must be directly accessible? and so on. LiberOffice developers do nothing of that sort, and working in it feels much more clumsy. (And it is NOT "just because you are used to MSO" - I have several times demonstrated, like I did with Wavelab, how much more streamlined MSO is.)

The now historical "Common User Access" standard was what made Windows win the marketplace. Users felt at home, safe, they knew what to do even in a program they had never seen before. Standard controls were placed in standard locations. Application independent terms were consistent. There was one way of selecting one-of-many, displaying a directory tree etc. This won over technical quality by a huge margin.

When GUIs came to the *nix world, it was proclaimed "mechanisms, not policies". In other words: Every developer should do it his own way, not learning from others. The user should have no benefit from conventions and standards for how to do things, and which functionality to support (from cut&paste to adjustable text size). Why should we cheapen it by making it obvious what to do?

Linuxers seem to insist that the only possible way, even theoretically, to run automated jobs (take regular backup as an example) is through a 7-bit ASCII text script activated by cron. Selecting directories, setting up filters, exection plans etc. in a GUI - they have no clue that such things exist at all. That it is even theoretically possible.

So when they set out to make a GUI, they model it by the CLI, so that old CLIers can map their well known option letters directly onto a form. Sorry, that doesn't make a good GUI.

Bottom line: Let us not wait for anything new and shiny that will solve the problems automagically. Let us rather spend resources on making GUIs with the tools we've got to be as good as they can be.

That requires that we learn a lot about how the users think and work. You can't do it in the basement of your parents' house. You can't work in a software house delivering (the same?) tools to everything from fish farming to brokers to artists. You must go out and learn about the users and their needs. That is not the most prominent characteristic of developers of free and open source software!
GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
Tomz_KV29-Mar-19 2:45
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
NPowDev29-Mar-19 3:08
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
Tomz_KV29-Mar-19 3:16
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
MSBassSinger29-Mar-19 5:01
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
Tomz_KV29-Mar-19 5:20
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MSBassSinger29-Mar-19 5:26
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Tomz_KV29-Mar-19 6:06
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
dandy7229-Mar-19 6:04
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Gerry Schmitz29-Mar-19 11:13
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GeneralRe: The computer revolution we need... Pin
maze31-Apr-19 22:32
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JokeInteresting... Pin
Mike Hankey28-Mar-19 7:25
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GeneralWeekend Getaway - Chicago Pin
kmoorevs28-Mar-19 6:11
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Marc Clifton28-Mar-19 6:24
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PSU Steve29-Mar-19 10:40
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W Balboos, GHB28-Mar-19 6:47
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