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GeneralRe: Thought of the Day Pin
Kris Lantz10-Feb-20 6:01
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Greg Utas10-Feb-20 9:02
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Member 798912210-Feb-20 12:15
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A few Norwegian examples:

Take "planet" as a 3-pronounciation case: Stress on the second syllable it is a planet (such as the earth). Stress on first syllable: The horizontal plane. That special Norwegian double-stress: When the motorboat laid down to soar over the waters, not stalling any more.

Or "urene". The watches (first syllable stress) that might become dirty (u-rene, non-clean) when you climb the scree slopes (doube stress).

Or "rosen": I believe the name Rosén is an imported one, probably from French (but the accent is far from always included in writing). If Mr. Rosen give you "rosen" that you deserve, it could either be the rose flower (double stress) or the praise (fist syllable stress).

You could send a message to your slaughter: "Lever lever, om du lever" (Deliver liver, if you are alive) - the fist "lever" with second syllable stress, the second with short "e" and equal stress, the third with long "e" and first syllable stress.

"Kvitter", first syllable stress, is the sound of birds. Second syllalbe stress: Sign it! Double stress: Get rid of, unload (verb in present tense)

"Hva koster koster på Koster?" could either be read as "What is the price of brooms at Koster?" (the Swedish islands) or "What does brooms at Koster brush away?", depending on the vowel sound of the first "koster". In either case, the two first "koster" has double-stress, the last one fist-syllalbe stress.

There are not that many triple-pronounciation words.

A number vary in the sound of certain vowel sounds, like "bord": If the "o" is like an "å" sound (compare to English: bought), it is a border (in embroidery). With the clear "o" sound (rarely heard in English, like the physicist Niels Bohr), it is a table.

Many words and names have a French origin, often with stress on the last syllable, but has been recognized in Norwegian for generations, such as the name Andre (second syllable stress). "Ikke Andre, men han andre" (not Andre, but the other guy), the other one has stress on the first syllable. "Pioner" with last syllable stress is a pioneer, while second syllable stress is the peony (flower).

"Fordeler" with stress on the second syllable could either mean advantages (stress on first syllable) or distributor (stress on the second). So to tease those el-car fans, I had a T-shirt made that declared "El-biler har ingen fordeler", which may be read either as "El-cars have no distributor" or as "El-cars have no advantages".

Some composite words have identical spelling as non-composite words, so the meaning depends if you make a slight separation between them. Like "baksete" - back seat, or troublesome? "Forslag" - is that a propsal, or a kind of feed (for-slag)?

The (context dependent) interpretation of one word can affect the pronounciation of antother: "fiber i kosten" could refer to nutritional fibers, "kosten" with an "å" sound, or fibers in your brush ("kosten" with an "o" sound) - both interpretation could be valid, in different contexts.

Some words may be read with a long or short wovel sound. "Halt" with a short "a" means limp, but with a long "a" it means dragged. So "Gutten var halt, men han ble halt med" (the boy was limp, but he was dragged along) has different pronounciations. "Vi spurte om veien, og måtte spurte videre" - with a long "u", "spurte" means asked, with a short "u", it means sprint ("We asked for directions, and had to sprint on). "Han fikk salt hesten og ga den litt salt" (he has the horse saddled and gave it a little salt) - long "a" for saddled, short "a" for NaCl.

"Jeg er stolt av ham, har alltid stolt på ham" - I am pround of him, always trusted him" differs in both vowel sound and duration (proud: "å"/short, trusted: sharp "o"/long)

For some words, a consonant may be soft/disappering or sharp: "Linda" with a clearly pronounced "d" is a girl's name. If you prounouce it as if it were written "linna", it is the tree, linden.

If you pronounce the final "t" in "foret", is is the past tense of "to feed"; if you suppress the "t" it is a noun, the feed that you give the animals. This may be combined with different stress patterns - a number of first-syllable stress suppresses the final "t" (and is a noun), double-stress and pronounced "t" is verb in the past tense. But not without exception, of course...

Norwegian dialects vary a lot, and some words have identical pronounciations in some dialects, different in others. "Overlegen", the head doctor or to be autocratic: In south Norway dialects, the last syllable is pronounced with clear "eeh" sound in both meanings. In north Norway, the head doctor is referenced with a clear "æ" sound, even sharper than the initial wovel of English "any". In some dialects, "tomt" has the same pronounciation for both meanings "empty" and "patch of land", in other dialects, empty is with an "å" sound, patch of land with an "o" sound.

The great majority of the "troublesome words" are those where one interpretation has that particular double stress pattern, not known in many languages. If you are into music, the best way to get a grip on it is to think of a double upbeat, like if you start to sing "Oh say can you see", but stop immediately after the "Oh-o". Usually, the two forms have a common root, with the double stress being the either a passive form or past tense of a word, first syllable stress being the noun, like "Reven var buret inne i buret" (the fox was caged in the cage). We have got hundreds of those pairs in Norwegian.

To illustrate the use of the words, and provide something that a speech generator could extract context / semantics from, I collect these words not as a plain list, but as a prose text (which has no intention of literary qualities; it is just to put the words into sentences). If you would like to practice your Norwegian, I'll send you my text file. But for a non-native Norwegian speaker, I guess reading it out loud without thorough preparation would be comparable to "English is tough stuff" (which I assume that you know - if not, google it!). If you are uncertain about the pronounciation, I'll gladly assist you!
GeneralRe: Thought of the Day Pin
Greg Utas10-Feb-20 12:59
professionalGreg Utas10-Feb-20 12:59 
GeneralRe: Thought of the Day Pin
Member 798912210-Feb-20 21:35
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Greg Utas11-Feb-20 5:51
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Jörgen Andersson11-Feb-20 7:15
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Greg Utas11-Feb-20 7:21
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Greg Utas11-Feb-20 8:29
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Jörgen Andersson11-Feb-20 8:44
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Member 798912211-Feb-20 10:15
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Greg Utas11-Feb-20 10:42
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DerekT-P10-Feb-20 23:32
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Member 798912211-Feb-20 1:36
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Greg Utas11-Feb-20 6:06
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Greg Utas10-Feb-20 13:17
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Member 798912210-Feb-20 22:55
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Greg Utas11-Feb-20 2:31
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