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Hello everyone,
Please why is the code below returning true ?
Integer num1 = new Integer(5);
   int num2 = 5;
   if(num1 == num2) {
   System.out.println(true);
   }
   else{
   System.out.println(false);
   }

I was thinking that an object created with the new keyword would be on the heap and a primitive data type would be on the stack ? I know that the "==" test for the references and not the value of the data. Thanks for any help in advance.

What I have tried:

Integer num1 = new Integer(5);
   int num2 = 5;
   if(num1 == num2) {
   System.out.println(true);
   }
   else{
   System.out.println(false);
Posted
Updated 21-Feb-23 18:50pm
Comments
Richard MacCutchan 22-Feb-23 3:59am    
It would be a pretty stupid language if it told you that 5 does not equal 5.

1 solution

No, integers are primitives, so they are value types, not reference which means that the variable is the value rather than a reference to the value and is not stored on the heap as a separate object.
Primitive and reference variables[^]
 
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Comments
UT7 22-Feb-23 1:48am    
@OriginaGriff, thanks for your response but I taught that Integer (wrapper class) wraps a primitive data type into objects and objects are located on the heap ? Please clarify. Thanks.
OriginalGriff 22-Feb-23 2:15am    
Because when you compare an int with an Integer, the system unboxes the int field that the Integer contains and compares the two primitive values.
Since a primitive doesn't (and can't) have a reference that's the only type of comparison it can do!
UT7 22-Feb-23 2:28am    
@OriginalGriff, okay, thanks a lot. I'm grateful

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