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Links to my code, did not use the code tags here because there are a lot of files... The links are in c++ syntax. This is my first post.

node.h
http://pastebin.com/3jrnNN5p
main.cpp
http://pastebin.com/LAa1tpi2
node.cpp
http://pastebin.com/GxYmne1L
bag.cpp
http://pastebin.com/Zup91snh
bag.h
http://pastebin.com/evdxtSx8

I have all of these files for my c++ homework and I am having trouble overloading the - and -= operators to use in my bags x and y. The homework states that we must do it like this;

For two bags x and y. The bag x-y contains all the items of x, with any items from y removed. For example, suppose that x has seven copies of the number 3, and y has two copies of the number 3 (ie 7-2 copies of the number 3). In the case where y has more copies of an item than x does, the bag x-y will have no copies of that item. The statement x -= y should have the same effect as the assignment x = x-y.

Does anyone know how this would be done? Maybe some examples using my code? Thanks, I do not wish for you to write the 2 overloading functions for me. If you are willing then by all means go ahead, but if you do try to explain it to me.
Posted
Updated 8-Mar-12 19:05pm
v2
Comments
Sergey Alexandrovich Kryukov 9-Mar-12 1:00am    
What's the question? Does anyone know how this would be done? The answer is "yes".
--SA

1 solution

It looks like you did not really got to the idea of the value of home assignment, not yet. Here is a hint for your: home assignments are very valuable. If you have to pay for education, please understand: this is perhaps most valuable part of your school activity worth paying for. If you do not do your home assignment 100% by yourself, this is the same as flushing money down the toiled. And you don't want it.

So, I suggest we give you another chance to use the opportunities your school gives you.

Good luck,
—SA
 
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Comments
[no name] 9-Mar-12 1:55am    
Correct, polite and diplomatic.

I would have started with "Now listen here you little.......".
Sergey Alexandrovich Kryukov 9-Mar-12 2:48am    
Thank you very much.

Strange, some inquirers complain I "abuse" them or, say, "piss-off"; and this sort of people are pretty usual.

I cannot help amazing how deep a cultural clash can be. From time to time, I face people who cannot bear any criticism; even such thing as "Look, it won't work" may cause hysterical reaction like "How can you tell this to me?! I always had excellent grades in my school and my mom told be I was genius!.." :-) At the same time, I was educated in that kind of creative atmosphere where your best friend never misses a chance to dip your face in dirt (I mean, by challenging you), especially if you dare to claim that you deeply understand some field, and I think this is perfectly normal, as the criticism is one of the main driving forces of the progress and culture. A decent person is expected to take the challenge and proof one's point or admit the failure, which is usually considered as respectful enough.

--SA
nv3 9-Mar-12 4:16am    
How true! I am watching the questions section only since a short time, but I am amazed at how many school kids think, this website is just there to do their home work. And I also admire at the patience and politeness that some of you regulars have with those kids.
Sergey Alexandrovich Kryukov 9-Mar-12 9:08am    
Thank you very much.

Nevertheless, at this moment my answer has one vote of 1, down-voted. Someone still thinks my answer is rude, because I didn't do the home assignment for OP, as if I was obliged to...

--SA
nv3 9-Mar-12 9:53am    
Tried to express my opinion in a voting for your solution. Should have done that in the first place. Thanks again for all your work here. You guys do a fabulous job.

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